Raffi Budakian

Raffi Budakian

Professor; Joint WIN/IQC Nanotechnology Endowed Chair in Superconductivity

​Professor Budakian's work in the past decade has focused on developing the experimental tools for ultra sensitive detection of electron and nuclear spins. He explores the application of these tools to address fundamental questions ranging from biology to quantum information.

Anton Burkov

Anton Burkov

Professor; Associate Graduate Officer

Dr. Burkov is a theoretical condensed matter physicist, currently focusing on the effects of nontrivial electronic structure topology and electron-electron interactions on experimentally observable properties of quantum materials.

Michel Gingras

Michel Gingras

Professor and Canada Research Chair in Condensed Matter Physics & Statistical Mechanics

Professor Gingras’ main interests are in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics, with a focus on systems with random disorder. He is also interested in strongly correlated classical and quantum condensed matter systems subject to strongly competing, or frustrated, interactions.

David Hawthorn

David Hawthorn

Professor; Associate Chair, Graduate Studies

The Quantum Materials Spectroscopy group, led by Dr. Hawthorn, studies Quantum Materials using resonant soft x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at synchrotrons such as the Canadian Light Source. We use these tools to investigate intertwinned order in Quantum Materials and shed light on the long-standing mysteries of high temperature superconductors.

Rob Hill

Robert Hill

Associate Professor; Teaching Fellow

Dr. Hill's research is focused on the experimental study of materials whose exotic properties are dominated by the collective quantum mechanical nature of their electrons and defy explanation using current theoretical paradigms.

Jan Kycia

Jan Kycia

Professor

Dr. Kycia's group works on the experimental investigation of superconducting and quantum mechanical devices; in particular Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs), GaAs quantum dots (Spin Qubits).

Roger Melko

Roger Melko

Professor; Canada Research Chair in Computational Many-Body Physics

Dr. Melko's research interests involve strongly-correlated many-body systems, with a focus on emergent phenomena, ground state phases, phase transitions, quantum criticality, and entanglement. He emphasizes computational methods as a theoretical technique, in particular the development of state-of-the-art algorithms for the study of strongly-interacting systems.

Dmitry Pushin

Dmitry Pushin

Assistant Professor

​Dmitry Pushin uses his broad background to apply quantum information processing methods to improve neutron interferometry, with the goal of making it accessible to the general scientific community as a resource for studying fundamental questions of physics, dark energy, phase transitions in condensed matter, magnetic materials in functional devices and materials science.

Gunter Scholz

Gunter Scholz

Associate Professor

Dr. Scholz uses electron microscopy to determine the compositional and crystallographic structure of compounds. His facility houses a Philips CM20 Super Twin High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope, and he invites researchers to make use of this modern, high voltage equipment.