Speakers Series: Robert FauverExport this event to calendar

Wednesday, November 13, 2013 — 11:30 PM EST

What does a summit Sherpa/personal representatives do - and why is it important?

This talk will focus on the role of a Sherpa in the summit process.  How are they selected in various countries, and does the selection process affect their role or effectiveness?  Robert Fauver will discuss the nine month run up to a Summit and the various meetings of Sherpas together, and their roles within their own governments.  A key focus of the talk will be about how Summit agendas are set in the Sherpa process.  The role of Sherpas during the Summit itself will also be discussed.

Robert Fauver is a former senior advisor to the U.S. Undersecretary of State for Economic Affairs. From 1995 to 1999, he served as the National Intelligence Officer for Economics on the National Intelligence Council. Previously he was Counsellor to the Undersecretary for International Affairs at the Treasury Department and Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and Economic Policy; in this capacity, Mr. Fauver was the President's personal representative (sherpa) responsible for overseeing preparations for the G7 Economic Summit process in 1993 and 1994. He also represented the President in the preparations for the 1993 APEC leaders’ conference in Seattle, Washington. He has also served as Director, Office of Industrial Nations and Global Analyses in the Treasury Department and Advisor to the Secretary of the Treasury for the Ministerial meetings of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. He was Deputy Undersecretary of State for Economic Affairs from 1991 to 1992, special assistant to the President and senior advisor for international economic policy from 1993 to 1994, and India-Pakistan coordinator for the State Department from 1998 to 1999.

Hagey Hall, Room 341

Robert Fauver Poster

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