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Degree requirements

For information about the graduate degree programs offered in each of the six research areas in the Department of Psychology, see Programs.

Master of Arts (MA) in Psychology

There are two alternative options for fulfilling the requirements for the two-year MA degree:

Thesis option

  • Satisfactory completion of four one-term (0.5 unit) courses accepted for graduate credit by the Department, including at least one of the following core statistics courses – PSYCH 630, Advanced Analysis of Variance; and PSYCH 632, Multiple Regression
  • Completion of a satisfactory Master’s Thesis

Submission of the Master's Thesis

Master’s Research Paper option

  • Students must petition the Associate Chair, Graduate Affairs, for special permission to enter the Master’s Research Paper option for fulfilling requirements for the MA degree.  (Special permission is not needed for Master of Applied Science students doing Master’s Research Papers in fulfillment of the requirements for that degree.)
  • Satisfactory completion of eight one-term (0.5 unit) courses accepted for graduate credit by the Department, including at least one of the following core statistics courses – PSYCH 630, Advanced Analysis of Variance; and PSYCH 632, Multiple Regression
  • Completion of a satisfactory Master’s Research Paper

Submission of the Master's Research Paper

Master of Applied Science (MASc)

MASc Program in Developmental and Communication Science (1 year):

Note: The requirement of a Master’s Research Paper applies only to those MASc DCS students completing a 2.5 unit Research Lab Internship (in conjunction with a 0.5 unit Community Location Internship). All other MASc DCS students, completing a 1.5 unit Research Lab Internship (in conjunction with a 1.5 unit Community Location Internship), should confirm the research project requirements with their advisor, who will be the sole grader of the project.

MASc Program in Industrial/Organizational Psychology (2 years):

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Psychology

Requirements for the PhD in Psychology consist of the following:

  1. Fulfilment of the departmental PhD breadth and statistics requirements.
  2. Completion of the set of core courses specified by the student’s Research Area (also see 'Notes' below). 
  3. Successful defense of the PhD thesis before an examining committee, followed by submission of the final thesis document, which includes any corrections or other changes as stipulated by the examining committee.  The PhD defense and the submission of the final thesis are governed by strict policies that must be followed.  See the following for important information.

Notes:

  • Because core courses are considered to be the foundational courses for the specific Area, students must take them for a grade, with the only exception being any core practicum courses (which are taken on a credit/no-credit grading basis). All statistics courses required by the specific Area must also be taken for a grade. (Any additional statistics courses, beyond those required ones, may be taken for credit.)
  • A course cannot be considered both breadth and core for a particular Area (except in unusual circumstances, e.g., not enough core courses are offered by an Area). Any additions or other alterations to the list of an Area’s core courses must be approved by the Area Head and the Graduate Associate Chair, and it must be clear how any newly proposed core course relates to the mandate of the specific Area. Subsequently, such alterations to courses designated as core for an Area must be vetted by Graduate Affairs Group (GAG) and then added to the Area degree requirements.
  • PhD students are strongly urged to fit their studies within one of the six designated Research Areas, if at all possible. However, occasionally a student who has completed an MA program may find that his or her PhD research interests extend beyond the existing Areas, or overlap between two or more of them. In such a case, the student may choose to apply to Special Programs. This option requires a Psychology faculty member willing to supervise the student’s planned PhD thesis, who will work together with the student to devise the set of core courses proposed to represent the areas of expertise broadly relevant to the thesis research, as well as the courses proposed to satisfy the departmental breadth and statistics requirements. A written proposal specifying both this plan of study and the proposed thesis topic, signed by the student and proposed supervisor, must be submitted to and approved by the Associate Chair, Graduate Affairs.
  • Across all courses a student completes for the PhD (including breadth, statistics, and core courses), at least half must have been taken for a grade (rather than credit/no-credit).

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Last updated: Oct 3, 2016