Events - 2022

Friday, May 27, 2022 — 4:00 PM EDT

Aiden Suter, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"A brief overview of monstrous moonshine"

Wednesday, May 25, 2022 — 9:30 AM EDT

Talk #1 (9:30-10:45): Tommaso Pacini, University of Torino, live via Zoom

Tuesday, May 24, 2022 — 1:30 PM EDT

Austin Sun, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Two Proofs of the Generalized Bézout's Theorem - Part I"

The goal of this talk series is to examine algebraic and geometric aspects of the generalized Bézout's theorem by giving two different proofs. In part I of this talk series, I will give an introduction to intersection theory and discuss geometric intuitions behind Bézout's theorem for plane curves. Then, I will present a proof of the generalized theorem based on the one found in Terry Tao's blog.

Thursday, May 19, 2022 — 2:30 PM EDT

Spencer Whitehead, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Decomposing Clifford curvature"

In this talk we further refine the curvature term in the Weitzenbock formula to obtain the Lichnerowitz formula. As time allows, we will go through examples of Clifford bundles and their Dirac operators.

MC 5403

Thursday, May 19, 2022 — 1:00 PM EDT

Speaker: None - this is a discussion-based seminar

Title: A Discussion on Universal Design for Learning

Please join us on Thursday, May 19 for the first teaching seminar of the Spring 2022 term. This session will be an open discussion on Universal Design for Learning (UDL): a way of thinking about teaching and learning that helps give all students an equal opportunity to succeed.

Wednesday, May 18, 2022 — 9:30 AM EDT

Talk #1 (9:30 - 11:00 am): Daren Cheng, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"A strong stability condition on minimal submanifolds and its implications, Part 1"

Tuesday, May 17, 2022 — 1:30 PM EDT

Sean Monahan, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"An introduction to horospherical varieties"

I will introduce horospherical varieties, which are a generalization of toric varieties. Similarly to toric varieties, these have a combinatorial description in terms of polyhedral geometry. I will outline the key parts from the combinatorial description for toric varieties, and we will see how to generalize these to the horospherical setting.

MC 5403

Thursday, May 12, 2022 — 2:30 PM EDT

Spencer Whitehead, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Clifford Algebras and Dirac Operators"

Wednesday, May 11, 2022 — 9:30 AM EDT

Talk #1 (9:30-10:30): Spiro Karigiannis, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo 

Title: Calibrated subbundles of R^7, part II
Abstract: I will continue, and hopefully conclude, the discussion of calibrated subbundles in R^7. We will quickly review the previous talk and then focus on the coassociative case, which corresponds to negative superminimal surfaces.

Monday, May 9, 2022 — 1:30 PM EDT

Luke MacLean, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Coding isomorphisms without using relations (part 2)"

A grand introduction to computability theory will be given so that in part 3 we can answer the questions posed in part 1.

MC 5403

Tuesday, May 3, 2022 — 2:00 PM EDT

Benoit Charbonneau and Spencer Whitehead, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Zometool workshop"

Hanging from the rafters of M3 is a Zometool construction of a projection of the 120-cell: one of five exceptional convex regular polytopes, and the four-dimensional analogue of the dodecahedron. This seminar is a hands-on learning activity, where participants have the chance to construct a Zometool 120-cell, as well as other projections of four-dimensional geometric constructions as time permits. 

Monday, May 2, 2022 — 1:30 PM EDT

Luke MacLean, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Coding isomorphisms without using relations"

Friday, April 29, 2022 — 2:30 PM EDT

Michael Albanese, UQAM

"The Yamabe Invariant of Non-Kähler Surfaces"

The Yamabe invariant is a real-valued diffeomorphism invariant coming from Riemannian geometry. Using Seiberg-Witten theory, LeBrun showed that the sign of the Yamabe invariant of a Kähler surface is determined by its Kodaira dimension. We consider the extent to which this remains true when the Kähler hypothesis is removed.

This seminar will be held jointly online and in person:

Thursday, April 28, 2022 — 1:00 PM EDT

Shengda Hu, Wilfrid Laurier University

"Riemannian metrics and generalized geometry"

We will discuss some computations involving Riemannian metrics in the context of generalized geometry. We will try to illustrate various constructions involving metric connections and their curvatures.

MC 5403

Friday, April 22, 2022 — 2:30 PM EDT

Jesse Madnick, National Taiwan University

"Associative 3-folds in Squashed 7-Spheres"

Thursday, April 21, 2022 — 1:00 PM EDT

Spiro Karigiannis, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Calibrated subbundles of $\mathbb R^7$"

Wednesday, April 20, 2022 — 4:00 PM EDT

Xuanlong Fu, University of Toronto

"Tracial  oscillation zero and stable rank one"

Let A be a separable (not necessarily unital) simple C*-algebra with strict comparison. We show that if A has tracial approximate oscillation zero then A has stable rank one and the canonical map \Gamma from the Cuntz semigroup of A to the corresponding lower-semicontinuous affine function space is surjective. The converse also holds.

Thursday, April 14, 2022 — 1:00 PM EDT

Christopher Lang, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"The Spectral Curve of a SU(2) Monopole (Part 2): Identifying Subbundles"

We will be following Hitchin's 1982 paper, Monopoles and Geodesics, continuing from the last talk. This time, we find two holomorphic subbundles of the holomorphic vector bundle from the previous talk and identify them. Time permitting, we will define the spectral curve and discuss its properties.

MC 5403

Wednesday, April 13, 2022 — 4:00 PM EDT

Katherina von Dichter, Technical University of Munich

"Mean inequalities for symmetrizations of convex bodies"

Friday, April 8, 2022 — 4:00 PM EDT

Aleksa Vujicic, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"The Problem with Braid"

Braid is a puzzle game released in 2008 whose central mechanic revolves around time manipulation. The goal of any level is to manipulate different level elements so that you can reach the exit - but is this always possible to do? It turns out that answering this question in general is impossible to do, and we look at why this is the case.

This talk will be held jointly online and in person:

Friday, April 8, 2022 — 2:30 PM EDT

Adam Jacob, University of California Davis

"The deformed Hermitian-Yang-Mills equation"

Thursday, April 7, 2022 — 1:00 PM EDT

Dennis The, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

"Simply-transitive CR real hypersurfaces in C^3"

Holomorphically (locally) homogeneous CR real hypersurfaces M^3 in C^2 were classified by Elie Cartan in 1932. A folklore legend tells that an unpublished manuscript of Cartan also treated the next dimension M^5 in C^3 (in conjunction with his study of bounded homogeneous domains), but no paper or electronic document currently circulates.

Wednesday, April 6, 2022 — 4:00 PM EDT

Jacob Campbell, Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

"Characters of the infinite symmetric group and random matrices"

Wednesday, April 6, 2022 — 1:00 PM EDT

Christian Schulz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

"A strong version of Cobham’s theorem"

Wednesday, April 6, 2022 — 12:00 PM EDT

Richard Hoshino, Northeastern University

"Developing Connections through Rich Mathematical Problems"

In this informal and interactive workshop, Richard will present three puzzles, and share stories of how these problems have led to authentic mathematical experiences for his students.  In the process of solving these puzzles together, we will uncover how these problems link key undergraduate topics taught in the Faculty of Mathematics.  Finally, we will explore how we might integrate inquiry-driven problem-solving into all of our courses.

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