Stealing Home: Unsettling Baseball as America's National PastimeExport this event to calendar

Tuesday, October 19, 2021 — 7:00 PM EDT

Event image with logos for Renison and WPL, and image of baseball glove with ball.

Tuesday, October 19, 2021
7:00pm ET

Register now on Eventbrite 

About this event

Origin stories do work. Often shrouded in mystery and myth, they are meant to make people feel connection, belonging, and intimacy with the story told. Baseball's origin stories are filled with all these wonderful myths - from a 5-year-old Abner Doubleday inventing the game on the shores of Lake Otsego in Cooperstown, New York to the legendary called shot by Babe Ruth. In this presentation, Dr. Craig Fortier, Assistant Professor of Social Development Studies at Renison University College, unravels some of the myths of baseball's origins in America to expose the soft cork of the American settler colonial project. How do we reconcile baseball's origins with current struggles against racist mascots and team monikers like those of the Cleveland and Atlanta baseball teams? This presentation will lead participants in a discussion on how we might unsettle baseball as we unsettle (North) America.

Panelists:

Dr. Craig Fortier (they/them; he/him) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Development Studies at Renison University College. Craig holds a PhD in Sociology from York University and has participated in movements for migrant justice and in support of Indigenous sovereignty for over a decade in Toronto, Three Fires Confederacy, Haudenosaunee, and Wendat territories.

They are the author of Unsettling the Commons: Social Movement Within, Against and Beyond Settler Colonialism as well as two articles on the history of baseball: "Stealing Home: decolonizing baseball’s origin stories and their relations to settler colonialism," in the journal Settler Colonial Studies and "A Field of Dreamers on Stolen Land: Practices of Unsettling on the Recreational Softball Diamonds of Tkaronto" (with Colin Hastings) in the Journal of Sport History.

Dr. Christopher Taylor (he/him) completed his PhD at Western University (Canada) in History and Migration & Ethnic Relations (MER). He currently teaches at the University of Waterloo in the Department of History and the Arts First program. His administrative roles at the University of Waterloo include serving as the Confronting Anti-Black Racism Advisor for the Equity Office, and acting as the Faculty of Arts’ Black Equity Strategist & Anti-Racism Advisor. He is a facilitator with the City of Toronto’s Confronting Anti-Black Racism Unit.

His book, Flying Fish in the Great White North: The Autonomous Migration of Black Barbadians, is available from Fernwood Publishing. He also worked in the Ontario Public Service (OPS) and began his career as a Policy Coordinator Intern in the Deputy Minister's Office at the Ministry of Labour. He was the Diversity and Inclusion Coordinator in the Ministry of the Attorney General's Diversity, Inclusion & Accessibility Office; a Senior Policy Advisor.

S M T W T F S
26
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
  1. 2021 (16)
    1. November (1)
    2. October (4)
    3. September (1)
    4. July (1)
    5. June (2)
    6. May (1)
    7. April (2)
    8. March (1)
    9. February (2)
    10. January (1)
  2. 2020 (26)
    1. December (1)
    2. November (4)
    3. October (1)
    4. September (2)
    5. August (1)
    6. March (6)
    7. February (7)
    8. January (4)
  3. 2019 (23)
  4. 2018 (15)
  5. 2017 (19)
  6. 2016 (32)
  7. 2015 (38)
  8. 2014 (41)
  9. 2013 (53)
  10. 2012 (40)
  11. 2011 (30)
  12. 2010 (31)
  13. 2009 (42)
  14. 2008 (14)