News archive - July 2018

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Better way found to determine the integrity of metals

Researchers at Waterloo have found a better way to identify atomic structures, an essential step in improving materials selection in the aviation, construction and automotive industries. The findings of the study could result in greater confidence when determining the integrity of metals.

Monday, July 30, 2018

Professor MacLeod receives Gold Medal Award for Lifetime Contributions to Psychology

Professor Colin MacLeod, Chair of Psychology, received 2018 Gold Medal Award for Lifetime Contributions to Canadian Psychology at a ceremony in June. The award celebrates outstanding Canadian psychologists who have dedicated their careers to the advancement of the field in this country and around the world.

Friday, July 27, 2018

Professor Robin Cohen receives Lifetime Achievement Award for research excellence

Professor Robin Cohen has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Canadian Artificial Intelligence Association. She is the first female recipient of the Association’s highest honour, an award that is conferred to individuals who have distinguished themselves through outstanding research excellence in artificial intelligence during the course of their academic career.

Monday, July 23, 2018

Study shows how the brain controls food cravings

A newly published study from the University of Waterloo shows that when activity in a specific part of the brain is suppressed, our desire for high-calorie foods increases. The investigators found that when they temporarily decreased activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex participants evaluated high-calorie snacks more positively. Several lifestyle factors affect the function of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex including stress and lack of sleep.

Thursday, July 19, 2018

Study determines younger children make more informed decisions

A new study from the University of Waterloo has found that in some ways, the older you get the worse your decision making becomes. The study established that younger children seem to make slightly better decisions than older children. The older children get, the more they tend to ignore some of the information available to them when making judgements, which though efficient can also lead to mistakes.

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