News archive - November 2018

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

New study finds a reliance on automobiles has fueled political backlash

Urban planning decisions from decades past are likely a contributing factor to the rise of right-wing populism, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

The study looked at urban planning and voting data from post-World War Two to 2010 outside Toronto, Canada. It found that development patterns that led to the reliance on the automobiles may also be fueling political attitudes that favour comfort and convenience and resist sustainable development. 

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Waterloo researchers named Canada Research Chairs

Four University of Waterloo researchers have been named new or renewing Canada Research Chairs (CRC) as part of a national announcement by the Government of Canada today. Waterloo’s recipients are:

Monday, November 12, 2018

Waterloo startup partners with Grand River Hospital to test innovative lung screening technology

A University of Waterloo startup, KA Imaging, is partnering with Grand River Hospital to conduct a pilot study using their innovative technology, a high-resolution multi-energy digital x-ray imager that detects lung nodules.

Friday, November 9, 2018

Researchers take steps towards batteryless smart devices

Waterloo researchers have taken a huge step towards making smart devices that do not use batteries or require charging.

These battery-free objects, which feature an IP address for internet connectivity, are known as Internet of Things (IoT) devices. If an IoT device can operate without a battery it lowers maintenance costs and allows the device to be placed in areas that are off the grid.

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Researchers develop deep knowledge AI system that could resolve bottlenecks in drug research

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new system that could significantly speed up the discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory tests.

The new technology called Pattern to Knowledge (P2K) can predict the binding of biosequences in seconds and potentially reduce bottlenecks in drug research.

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