Science at Canada's Leading Innovative University

As an integral part of Canada’s most innovative university, the Faculty of Science is a global leader and a preferred destination for those seeking to engage in world-class basic and applied research.

We take this valuable research strength and translate into hands-on education and co-op experiences that prepare Science students for rewarding careers. Student-directed programs such as Concept Science give entrepreneurial students the opportunity to turn their ideas into businesses while the iGEM team compete at international synthetic biology competitions. Our award-winning Science Outreach events are designed to inspire the next generation of scientists.

From understanding the universe, to protecting our water resources to improving the health of Canadians to educating the next generation, Waterloo Science is shaping the future through discovery.

  1. Nov. 24, 2020Q & A with the experts: The problem with herd immunity and COVID-19

    The “herd immunity strategy” has been discussed and largely rejected by scientists as a strategy to combat COVID-19.

  2. Nov. 23, 2020Professor David Hawthorn’s lab uses x-rays to see waves of electrons in superconductors
    Three researchers standing in front of a metal contraption at the Canadian Light Source

    Although physicists understand the properties of metals, insulators and semiconductors extremely well, the basic physics of high-temperature superconductors has remained a great mystery for over 30 years.

  3. Nov. 20, 2020Pesticide deadly to bees now easily detected in honey
    Red and yellow wildflowers in a meadow

    A common insecticide that is a major hazard for honeybees is now effectively detected in honey, thanks to a simple new method.

    Researchers at the University of Waterloo developed an environmentally friendly, fully automated technique that extracts pyrethroids from the honey. Pyrethroids are one of two main groups of pesticides that contribute to colony collapse disorder in bees, a phenomenon where worker honeybees disappear, leaving the queen and other members of the hive to die. Agricultural producers worldwide rely on honeybees to pollinate hundreds of billions of dollars worth of crops.

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