Transformative Quantum Technologies Public LectureExport this event to calendar

Monday, October 1, 2018 — 2:00 PM EDT

Physics beyond Ohm's Law

Qi-Kun Xue, Vice-President, Tsinghua University

Xue QikunOhm's law, discovered in 1827, is one of the most important laws for quantitative descriptions of the physics of electricity. It determines the performance and energy usage efficiency of all electrical/electronic devices, from a tiny transistor in integrated circuits to anywhere power lines for electric transmission and distribution in a grid.  Superconductivity and quantum Hall effect as well as quantum anomalous Hall effect (the quantum Hall effect without external magnetic field), which do not obey the Ohm’s Law, provide a way to solve the problem with electrical resistance for better use of electricity. In this talk, I would talk about how to increase the transition temperature of superconductivity and quantum anomalous Hall effect. I would argue that realization of superconductivity and quantum anomalous Hall effect at temperatures above liquid nitrogen boiling temperature, and particularly around room temperature, may trigger the next industrial revolution.

Xue Qikun is a physicist of Tsinghua University, Beijing. He has done much work in Condensed Matter Physics, especially on superconductors and topological insulators. In 2013, Xue was the first to achieve the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), an unusual orderly motion of electrons in a conductor, in his laboratory at Tsinghua University. Xue is a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, vice president for research of Tsinghua University, and director of State Key Lab of Quantum Physics. In 2016 he was one of the first recipients of the new Chinese Future Science Award for experimental discovery of high-temperature superconductivity at material interfaces and the QAHE. This award has been described as "China's Nobel Prize".

Impactful, Small Quantum Devices: Sensing and Transduction

David Cory, Canada Excellence Research Chair Laureate, University of Waterloo

David CoryQuantum mechanics is the ultimate law of nature and when we engineer devices to function uniquely quantum mechanically then we reach the highest efficiency allowed by nature. For many interesting tasks, this quantum efficiency greatly exceeds that of classical devices. Today we are developing quantum sensors with applications in medicine, navigation and searches for dark energy. I will describe some of the ways that quantum devices allow us to outperform any possible classical device.

David Cory is a leading global innovator in experimental quantum information physics and quantum engineering, whose work is used in a range of applications, from the medical field to the oil industry. He is the Canada Excellence Research Chair Laureate at the University of Waterloo, and deputy director for research at the Institute for Quantum Computing. He is an associate researcher at Canada's Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, and is chair of the advisory committee for the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.  He is on the science advisory board of the Shanghai Center for Complex Physics.

Location 
QNC - Quantum Nano Centre
Room 0101
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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