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Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Cheaper and easier way found to make plastic semiconductors

An illustration of a plastic, flexible solar cell.

Cheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists at the University of Waterloo.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Hacking competition finalist makes a splash into the entrepreneurial scene

Microfibres in water at 40x magnification.

Waterloo graduate student Lauren Smith and her Velocity Science start-up PolyGone Technologies are developing products to tackle the bigger fish in the microplastics problem – microfibres.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Centre for Bioengineering and Biotechnology launches seed funding program

Seed funding Centre for Bioengineering and Biotechnology

This year, the Centre for Bioengineering and Biotechnology launched its first ever Seed Fund program in hopes of driving scientific innovation, growth, and opportunity through the support of collaborative research across UWaterloo's six faculties. Eleven Science researchers received funding for bioengineering and biotechnology research projects through the new program. 

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Water Institute announces latest Seed Grants

Plant growing in a chemistry flask

Four interdisciplinary teams led by University of Waterloo researchers are set to advance water research in creative, unconventional ways. New approaches to detect and manage micropollutants, techniques that predict the impacts of climate change on snow and lakes, and new modelling techniques will be explored through $69,000 in Water Institute seed grants.

Monday, April 16, 2018

University of Waterloo develops new way to fight HIV transmission

Emmanuel Ho

Scientists at the University of Waterloo have developed a new tool to protect women from HIV infection.

The tool, a vaginal implant, decreases the number of cells that the HIV virus can target in a woman’s genital tract. Unlike conventional methods of HIV prevention, such as condoms or anti-HIV drugs, the implant takes advantage of some people’s natural immunity to the virus.