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Friday, October 27, 2017

Winning tiles from Waterloo's 2017 Periodic Table Contest unveiled

Period Table New Element contest winning tiles for Nihonium, Muscovium, Tennessine, and Oganesson.

Four new tile designs for the Periodic Table Project were announced this fall as winners of the New Elements Contest organized Chem 13 News magazine, the Waterloo's Chemistry outreach magazine for chemistry educators.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Centre for Contact Lens Research (CCLR) Renamed Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

CORE

For nearly three decades, the world’s optometry and ophthalmology communities have partnered with the Centre for Contact Lens Research (CCLR) at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry and Vision Science on pioneering studies. Beginning in January 2018, the organization will adopt a new name; the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE).

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Bacterial Scissorhands: Biologists discover bacteria have new and improved flagella

Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Photo source: iStock.

Biologists from the University of Waterloo, University of British Columbia and Health Canada have discovered hundreds of bacterial species equipped with a new and powerful type of flagella covered in enzymes.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Two of a kind: How we share our microbiome with our partner

Couple holding hands sitting on a bed.

Biologists at the University of Waterloo find the unique microbial communities living on our feet can be used to predict who we live with.

The study, published this month in mSystems, combined high-throughput sequencing and artificial intelligence to see what the microbome living on the skin of cohabiting couples can tell us about the microbial “fingerprints” that we leave on our loved ones.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Dead fish do tell tales: Using the necrobiome to measure impact of wastewater on aquatic life

Rainbow darter fish in a respirometer used to measure metabolic activity.

Waterloo Biologists Paul Craig and Andrew Doxey find fish struggle to live in the Grand River downstream from Kitchener, Ontario’s wastewater treatment plant.