News for Earth and Environmental Sciences

Thursday, February 6, 2020

At least 13% of wastewater treated by Southern Ontario septic systems ends up in streams

The presence of artificial sweeteners has revealed that at least 13 percent of septic system wastewater from rural Southern Ontario homes eventually makes its way into local streams.

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Waterloo used the presence of artificial sweeteners excreted from humans to identify the wastewater content in streams across rural Southern Ontario.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Mental Health Resources

Bell Let's Talk logo

Today is Bell Let’s Talk Day, and we’re joining in to help create positive change.

Mental illness affects people of all ages and from all walks of life. According to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, one in five people in Canada will experience a mental health issue or illness in any given year.

As part of our initiatives to promote positive mental health across the Faculty of Science, we have collected some resources, so that if you need resources know where to turn.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Faculty of Science Launches Innovation Hub

Science Innovation Hub logo.

An exciting and innovative transition has been taking place in the Faculty of Science, and we are now pleased to announce the opening of the Science Innovation Hub!

Friday, January 10, 2020

#StrongerTogether through Storytelling – Catching up with Professor Kirsten Müller after Homeward Bound

Orca whale swimming amongst floating ice

Antarctica is a cold, mostly barren continent, defined by its isolation and snow. It is also a place that has been set aside for peace and science. The challenges of this desolate and harsh environment provide the necessary surroundings to foster teamwork and collaboration for those living and researching there.

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Natural causes are the key driver of change in Athabasca Delta flood patterns, research shows

Athabasca Delta aerial view

Natural environmental processes—not upstream energy projects—are the primary cause of changing flood patterns in Alberta’s Athabasca Delta, new research shows.

The research also shows there is no evidence to support the perception that energy projects have increased the amount of metal pollutants in the delta ecosystem.