TomorrowLove inspires Alexandra to define her own path for the future

Last week, University of Waterloo students graced the stage of the Modern Languages Theatre of the Arts in the production, TomorrowLove. During November 14 to 17, students were invited to witness seven short playlets written by Rosamund Small. These seven short plays interwoven in TomorrowLove surrounded topics of technology, love, and relationships. The story delved into the future of relationships and how technology affects the way people relate to one another. I chatted with Alexandra Carruthers, a double-major English and Theatre and Performance student who worked on the production, to talk about her first time working with a playlet.

Alexandra Carruthers.

As a performance major, Alexandra was able to choose a role in the play she felt most connected to, and she chose to be the head of lighting. What started as a capstone project made her start thinking about what she wanted to do in the future.

For those who might not be familiar with the concept of the play, TomorrowLove, can you provide a brief summary?

Alexandra: We have selected seven playlets from a larger collection of fifteen written by Rosamund Small, and each playlet dives into themes of love and technology. One thing that I was stuck on was how technology can reveal things about conflict in our relationships, and what do we do with that information. Each short play features technology that came from the future and does not exist. And the characters are learning how they relate to each other with this new technology.

Student performing on stage in TomorrowLove.

What are some things that you have done in your role?

Alexandra: One thing that I really enjoyed is being able to read through the play and make free associations. I wrote down things that came into my mind as I was reading the play. This included inspiration for colour or lines that I felt could change in the play involving a certain character, and how I can indicate that with light. I really like the aspect of this in the play and how we make these associations.

On the technical side, I’m learning how to do these vector works, an industry standard software used for creating plots, and where you store the different positions of light used in a production. Learning this was really useful, because I know when I graduate that it’s going to be the program I’m going to use in the working world.

How has being involved in the play and the theatre community enhanced your student experience?

Alexandra: I found in my later years as a student that I’ve been able to connect all of my classes in different ways. I took English 309C, a rhetorical theory class, and I remember making connections from Jacques Derrida’s deconstruction theory to what I’m working on now. Lately, I’ve been able to take things from my own courses and relate it to what I’m doing.

Two students performing on stage in TomorrowLove

How has the played changed your outlook as a student?

Alexandra: I see plays and theatre more as research projects into really difficult themes and questions. And overall, just representations of our culture and how our culture is being self-reflected. You take a play and you dive deep into it and what it means right here, right now. It is important to consider questions like “why is it important that we do TomorrowLove in a theatre in Waterloo during the fall term?” I think my involvement has really opened up to see that everything is done for a reason.

The key elements of the play surround technology. Has the play changed your view of technology?

Alexandra: Before, I was really cynical about technology. But this play has shown me that we don’t have to be negative about the fact that we stare at our screens all the time.

Our phones are a means of connection for us. Technology is just trying to find its place in our world.


Alexandra’s connection to the production and her involvement behind the scenes has shown her that there are numerous opportunities that lie ahead for her, tomorrow and onward!

 
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