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Tuesday, November 23, 1999

Shatter cones at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada (46°36'N, 81°11'W)

The photograph illustrates a series of shatter cones exposed at Sudbury. The Sudbury area has the dubious record of being the target area of two major impacts. The first caused the ca. 200-km-wide Paleoproterozoic impact (ca. 1850 my ± 3 my) that created the Sudbury Irruptive, and the second formed the nearby Wanapitei impact structure just 37 million years ago.

Tuesday, November 23, 1999

Manicouagan, Québec, Canada (51°23'N, 68°42'W)

This satellite view clearly shows the Manicouagan impact site. The ring is developed in impact breccias that were eroded by glaciation and have subsequently been flooded. The circular structure is 70 km in diameter, but the impact site is approximately 100 km wide. Impact shock structures are well developed in the surrounding bedrock of the Canadian Shield. Since this crater is slightly over 200 million years old, the original rim has been removed by erosion. Also on the picture is the Sudbury impact site, as well as Wanapitei crater (not indicated, but close to Sudbury).

Tuesday, November 23, 1999

Tekties and strewnfields

By: Alan Morgan

Tuesday, November 23, 1999

Collecting micrometeorites

Courtesy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Shooting stars are not, of course, really stars. They are actually small bits of rock and metal that collide with Earth's upper atmosphere and, because of friction, burn up. On rare occasions, man-made satellites and spacecraft parts fall into the atmosphere and burn up the same way.

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