News archive - May 2000

Wednesday, May 24, 2000

Geoscape Grand River Ontario

Most of the readers of Wat On Earth will be unaware of a wildly successful Geological Survey of Canada initiative launched by the Vancouver Office and titled "Geoscape Vancouver". Bob Turner and John Clague were the prime movers, ably assisted by many others in the Vancouver Region. The product is a large, extremely colourful, wall poster suited for classroom use and public viewing that demonstrates different aspects of the geological and physiographical setting of Vancouver and its environs.

Wednesday, May 24, 2000

Deep Impacts

By: Christine Kulyk

When something big from outer space
Collides with Earth, it leaves a trace--
Supreme celestial punctuation
Carving out an indentation
To scar the planet's face.

The years that pass with stately pace
May steadily obscure the trace
Of crater outlines and location,
And so obstruct investigation
With forces that efface.

Wednesday, May 24, 2000

Lew Brubacher: Year 2000 winner of the McNeil award

University of Waterloo chemistry professor Lew Brubacher (right) is this year's winner of a medal from the Royal Society of Canada to honour his work in editing Chem 13 News and other activities to spread the importance and excitement of chemistry.

Wednesday, May 24, 2000

The formation of oil and other elements required to produce a petroleum accumulation

The majority of geoscientists believe that most oil has an organic origin, derived ultimately from the remains of organisms (mainly microscopic marine phytoplankton) that were buried with ancient sediments deposited on the sea floor. Although there are trace amounts of this buried organic matter in almost all sedimentary rocks, unique geological and geochemical conditions are required to generate, expel and trap significant amounts of oil.

Wednesday, May 24, 2000

Selwyn's rock

Early in 2000 I happened to be driving through the Inman Valley, south of Adelaide in South Australia when the sign "Glacier Rock Restaurant" caught my eye. I must confess that I am not intimately familiar with Australia's Quaternary history, but even from my meagre knowledge of Antipodean geography I seemed to be a little too far south of the Flinders Ranges and way too far west of the Snowy Mountains to imagine that this was some glacial relic.

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