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Collaborative Water Program degree requirements

Degree Requirements for PhD students who have a Masters-Water degree

Degree Requirements 

  • Meet the requirements of your home department, including any specific courses, thesis or seminar milestones
  • The Collaborative Water Program portion of your degree requires two core interdisciplinary courses and one research seminar milestone. These provide fundamental multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and complement your specialist courses and water-related research in your home department

WATER 601 Introduction to Integrated Water Management

This course provides an overview of current issues and challenges in water research and management from a variety of disciplines, including water science, engineering, economics, and governance perspectives. The purpose is to provide students with a broad knowledge base of the key theories, concepts and terminology from various water-related fields, and to allow them to develop connections with peers, water researchers and professionals in other areas of study.
Prerequisite for WATER 602, taken in the Winter term.

crowd in lecture hall
Case studies that demonstrate the complexity and opportunities for interdisciplinary water research and innovation, and that allow students to collaboratively explore ideas, will be examined. Seminars, presentations and discussions with faculty members and professionals from different disciplines will introduce students to current research and practice.  Course readings will focus on key concepts, perspectives and terminology from multiple disciplines.

WATER 602 Integrated Water Resources Management Project

This course builds on WATER 601 and focuses on the Grand River Watershed. The course normally includes a six to eight-day field trip held at the beginning of the term, followed by one or two seminar sessions during the first month of the term. The field trip will allow students to examine specific watershed components, landscapes, infrastructure and conditions from interdisciplinary perspectives. Students will travel across the watershed and meet water practitioners, managers, scientists, volunteers and others concerned with watershed health to learn first-hand about watershed issues and management approaches.
Follows WATER 601, taken in the Fall term.

students doing weater research in the Grand River Based on the interactive field trips and supporting materials, a multidisciplinary group project will be required where students identify an approach to investigating an emerging watershed issue.

Research Seminar 1

The student is required to present a seminar on their thesis or major paper research proposal and, if appropriate, early-stage results to current and past water students and Water Institute faculty members. Seminars will normally occur following the completion of WATER 601 and WATER 602. Seminars will provide the opportunity for students to discuss how learnings from water courses were applied in, or influenced, research proposals or research work in the student’s home department.  Seminars will normally be poster presentations at Water Institute organized events.  The seminar is not an oral examination of the thesis or paper; rather, its purpose is to develop the student's ability to communicate their research in an organized and informative manner.

students presenting research posters at Symposium

Degree Requirements (for PhD students who have a Masters-Water degree)

  • The following only applies to PhD students who have completed WATER 601 and WATER 602 as part of their Masters Water degree:
    • Meet the requirements of your home department, including any specific courses, thesis or seminar milestones
    • The Collaborative Water Program portion of your degree requires one course and two milestone requirements

Course Requirement

One graduate-level water course from outside the student’s home faculty agreed to by the student’s Supervisor and the Collaborative Water Program director.

Collaborative Water Program Research Seminar 2

The student is required to present a seminar on their PhD thesis proposal to current and past water students and Water Institute faculty members.  Seminars will normally occur following the completion of required courses and the comprehensive exam. Seminars should present how learnings from the Collaborative Water Program were applied in, or influenced, thesis proposals. Seminars will normally be poster presentations or talks at Water Institute organized events. The seminar is not an oral examination of the thesis proposal; rather, its purpose is to develop the student's ability to communicate their research in an organized and informative manner.

Collaborative Water Program Academic Contribution

The student is required to make an academic contribution to the Collaborative Water Program. The proposed contribution will be documented by the student and approved by the student’s Supervisor and the Collaborative Water Program director. Potential contributions may include, but not be limited to:

  • Development of new or improved curricula or course content;
  • Delivery of a lecture(s);
  • Preparation of a publication;
  • Preparation of a case study;
  • Mentorship of a group of students