News archive - May 2018

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Global Water Futures meeting mobilizes Waterloo researchers tackling climate change

Global Water Futures Waterloo meeting

Last week, the Water Institute gathered University of Waterloo researchers involved in the Global Water Futures (GWF) project for a university-wide meeting to share updates and meet new members of the GWF core team.

Friday, May 25, 2018

Waterloo Menstrual Hygiene Day opens up dialogue on global sanitation and hygiene crisis

woman with wash buckets

By Ana Jung, the Water Institute

Maintaining personal hygiene is important in leading a healthy life. For women, this is of particular importance during menstruation. However, many women around the world face barriers in menstrual hygiene management including knowledge, attitudes and practices and lack of water and sanitation/hygiene facilities.  

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Phosphexᵀᴹ wraps up field testing as a $10 million George Barley Water Prize contender

Phosphex test site George Barley Water Prize

Today, the University of Waterloo PhosphexTM team wraps up its field tests where they’ve demonstrated their technology’s ability to remove phosphorus from Holland Marsh in Bradford, Ontario.

Thursday, May 17, 2018

‘This is an eye-opener’: Changes in global water supply hint at future conflicts and crises

Wi in the media

Water Institute Executive Director Roy Brouwer spoke to the Globe and Mail on May 16 to provide comment on the new portrait of the world's water supply, gleaned from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, or GRACE.

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Heidi Swanson interviewed by Radio Canada International on $1.2 M investment in solving mystery of dwindling char in Arctic

water institute members in the media

Biology professor and Water Institute member Heidi Swanson was interviewed by Radio Canada International (RCI) on May 12 on the $1.2 million she received to lead a research project that aims to help solve the mystery of dwindling char numbers in Arctic. The funding, to be received over a five-year period, will come from the Federal government’s $75 million Coastal Restoration Fund. The aim of the project is to support community-partnered research and restore fish in the Coppermine River and other river systems near Kugluktuk, Nunavut.

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