You are here

News archive

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Understanding and protecting the lakes in the Peace-Athabasca Delta

Mitchell Kay being interviewed for Parks Canada Documentary

Located in northeast Alberta, the Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD) is one of the most magnificent wetlands in the world. Serving as the junction of four major North American waterfowl migratory routes, millions of ducks and geese descend to feed and nest here each summer.

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Seed-grant-funded bioenergetics workshop facilitates knowledge exchange and collaboration

chagger and van cappellen

A University of Waterloo Microbial Bioenergetics Workshop was held on July 23-24 at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) campus in Waterloo, organized by Water Institute member Christina Smeaton. Funded by a Water Institute Seed Grant, the two-day workshop successfully facilitated knowledge exchange and collaboration between academic researchers across disciplines and industries.

Friday, July 20, 2018

Engineering student wins American Geophysical Union Horton (Hydrology) Research Grant

Fredrick Cheng awarded the American Geophysical Union Horton Research Grant

Collaborative Water Program alum Fredrick Cheng, PhD candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been awarded the American Geophysical Union Horton (Hydrology) Research Grant. Each year this prestigious grant is awarded to up to three students during their candidacy for a PhD degree in hydrology, water resources, or a closely related field.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Water Institute participates in United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development

Roy Brouwer at the United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development

Executive director of the Water Institute Roy Brouwer, professor in Waterloo’s Department of Economics, was invited to be a part of a panel discussion during the 2018 session of the United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) in New York City on July 13.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

AI technology could help protect water supplies

Monica Emelko

Progress on new artificial intelligence (AI) technology could make monitoring at water treatment plants cheaper and easier and help safeguard public health.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed AI software capable of identifying and quantifying different kinds of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, a threat to shut down water systems when it suddenly proliferates.

  1. 2019 (48)
    1. May (9)
    2. April (16)
    3. March (10)
    4. February (3)
    5. January (10)
  2. 2018 (101)
    1. December (3)
    2. November (12)
    3. October (10)
    4. September (7)
    5. August (6)
    6. July (6)
    7. June (12)
    8. May (10)
    9. April (7)
    10. March (9)
    11. February (9)
    12. January (10)
  3. 2017 (79)
    1. December (3)
    2. November (9)
    3. October (7)
    4. September (4)
    5. August (14)
    6. July (10)
    7. June (7)
    8. May (5)
    9. April (7)
    10. March (4)
    11. February (5)
    12. January (4)
  4. 2016 (37)
  5. 2015 (30)
  6. 2014 (21)
  7. 2013 (23)
  8. 2012 (33)