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Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Water experts mobilize in Toronto to discuss water security

Water on rocks

There are 700 million people in 43 countries currently suffering from water scarcity. By 2025, 1.8 billion people are expected to be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity.

On June 17-20, Water Institute members and water experts from around the world are gathering in Toronto to discuss issues of water security at the First International Conference on Water Security.

Monday, May 7, 2018

Graduate student represents clean water and sanitation during Sustainable Development Solutions Network Canada launch

Elaine Ho

Elaine Ho, PhD student in Waterloo’s School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability, has always had an affinity for water. As a child, Elaine was fascinated at the world beneath the surface that is so different from our own.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Making connections beyond the classroom

Maricor Jane Arlos

Facilitating and promoting interdisciplinary water research and education is a primary role of the Water Institute at the University of Waterloo. On a regular basis, the Water Institute brings an RBC Visiting Fellow to campus to stimulate discussion and the exploration of collaborative research opportunities with Water Institute faculty and students.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Water Institute member is evolving hydrological models for Canada's diverse landscapes

James Craig

For Water Institute member James Craig, surface water modelling started out as a side project.

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Exploring glaciers to understand climate change

Christine Dow

Glaciers can warn us about the looming dangers of climate change, but it takes a multidisciplinary scientist (with a warm jacket) to interpret the message.

Glaciers may have the reputation of moving slowly, but deep below them, unseen by humans, things are moving more quickly every day. Global warming is melting our glaciers, creating streams of icy water and slush below the surface. If this water spreads out, it can lubricate the ice above it and cause the glaciers to flow faster. While this melt and the resulting glacier flow tells scientists how fast our climate is changing, it’s up to a new breed of scientist to tell us how fast we need to act. 

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