Isolation and Belonging Book Cover2013.  Belonging and Isolation in the Hellenistic World. Eds. Sheila Ager and Riemer Faber. Toronto (University of Toronto Press).

https://utorontopress.com/9781442644229/belonging-and-isolation-in-the-hellenistic-world/

Belonging and Isolation in the Hellenistic World presents essays by leading international scholars who consider how the cosmopolitanism of the Hellenistic age also brought about tensions between individuals and communities, and between the small local community and the mega-community of oikoumene, or ‘the inhabited earth.’ With a range of social, artistic, economic, political, and literary perspectives, the contributors provide a lively exploration of the tensions and opportunities of life in the Hellenistic Mediterranean.

Belonging and Isolation in the Hellenistic World makes a significant contribution to an exciting area of scholarly exploration. Representing a mix of accomplished scholars from a variety of disciplines, this stimulating volume is an enjoyable read with gems throughout.’ - Joan Burton, Department of Classics, University of Maryland.

Table of Contents:

Introduction: Belonging and Isolation in the Hellenistic World Themes and Questions (Sheila Ager and Riemer Faber).

PART ONE: INTERCULTURAL POETICS AND IDENTITY

1. ‘If I Am from Syria – So What?’: Meleager’s Cosmopoetics (Regina Höschele).

2. Invective from the Cultural Periphery: The Case of Hermeias of Kourion (Peter Bing).

3. Genre and Ethnicity in the Epigrams of Meleager (Kathryn Gutzwiller).

PART TWO: ON THE MARGINS? ETHNICITY AND HELLENICITY

4. Belonging and Isolation in Central Anatolia: The Galatians in the Graeco- Roman World (Altay Coşkun).

5. The Importance of Being Aitolian (Joseph Scholten).

6. Democracy in the Hellenistic World (Glenn Bugh).

PART THREE: SYMPLOKE: MEDITERRANEAN SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS

7. Polybios and International Systems Theory (Arthur Eckstein).

8. Networks in the Hellenistic Economy (Gary Reger).

9. Diplomacy and the Integration of the Hasmonean State (Claude Eilers).

PART FOUR: ALEXANDRIA: THE INVENTION OF A CITY

10. Founding Alexandria in the Alexandrian Imagination (Andrew Erskine).

11. The Birth Myths of Ptolemy Soter (Daniel Ogden).

12. ‘Alexandrianism’ Again: Regionalism, Alexandria, and Aesthetics (Craig I. Hardiman).

PART FIVE: INTEGRATION: SOCIAL IN-GROUPS AND OUT-GROUPS

13. Staging the Oikos: Character and Belonging in Menander’s Samia (Christina Vester).

14. Making Yourself at Home in the Hellenistic World (Ruth Westgate).

15. Mère-patrie et patrie d’adoption à l’époque hellénistique: Réflexions à partir du cas des mercenaires crétois de Milet (Patrick Baker).

PART SIX: INSULAE: GEOPOLITICS AND GEOPOETICS

16. ‘Entirely Ignorant of the Agora’ (Alkiphron 1.14.3): Fishing and the Economy of Hellenistic Delos (Ephraim Lytle).

17. De l’ouverture au repli: Les prêts du sanctuaire de Délos (Léopold Migeotte).

18. Connections, Origins, and the Construction of Belonging in the Poetry of Kallimachos (Mary Depew).

 

Celebrity, Fame & Infamy2020. Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy in the Hellenistic World. Ed. Riemer Faber. Toronto (University of Toronto Press). https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.3138/9781487531782/html

This book traces the roots of modern notions of celebrity, fame, and infamy back to the Hellenistic period of classical antiquity, when sensational personages like Cleopatra of Egypt and Alexander the Great became famous world-wide.

Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy in the Hellenistic World, edited by Riemer Faber and a product of the Waterloo Institute for Hellenistic Studies at the University of Waterloo, offers a new and unparalleled contribution to Hellenistic studies: a fascinating exposé of multi-media self-promotion from Alexander the Great to Antony’s Cleopatra. This interdisciplinary collection also demonstrates that the lives of the rich and famous, and often times infamous, were as interesting to ancient audiences around a Mediterranean basin linked by efficient communication and international travel as they are to moderns tuned in to contemporary social media.’ – James J. Clauss, Department of Classics, University of Washington.

Table of Contents:

Introduction: Distinctives of Hellenistic Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy (Riemer Faber).

1. Fama and Infamia: The Tale of Grypos and Tryphaina (Sheila l. Ager)

2. Models of Virtue, Models of Poetry: The Quest for“Everlasting Fame” in Hellenistic Military Epitaphs (Silvia Barbantani).

3. Can Powerful Women Be Popular? Amastris: Shaping a Persian Wife into a Famous Hellenistic Queen (Monica d’Agostini).

4. Remelted or Overstruck: Cases of Monetary Damnatio Memoriae in Hellenistic Times? (François de Callataÿ).

5. Ptolemaic Officials and Officers in Search of Fame (Christelle Fischer-Bovet).

6. Lemnian Infamy and Masculine Glory in Apollonios’ Argonautica (Judith Fletcher).

7. The “Good” Poros and the “Bad” Poros: Infamy and Honour in Alexander Historiography (Timothy Howe).

8. Writing Monarchs of the Hellenistic Age: Renown, Fame, and Infamy (Jacqueline Klooster).

9. Creating Alexander: The“Official”History of Kallisthenes of Olynthos (Waldemar Heckel).