CEWIL Research Matters: December 2017

Article #1: The role of entrepreneurship program models and experiential activities on engineering student outcomes (2016)

Author 

Nathalie Duval-Couetil, Angela Shartrand and Teri Reed

Journal 

Advances in Engineering Education

Source 

Advances in Engineering Education (PDF)

Purpose

To examine differences in student perceptions of entrepreneurial knowledge, skills and self-efficacy based on different types of entrepreneurial program models and experiential activities.

Methodology

A survey was completed by 501 senior engineering students enrolled in three institutions with different models of entrepreneurship education.

Key findings

Higher perception of entrepreneurial knowledge was associated with the number of entrepreneurship courses taken and participation in experiential learning activities.

 

Practitioner's thoughts by

Jeremy Steffler (Faculty Relations Manager, Mathematics and Research Centres/Institutes, University of Waterloo)

What insights did you gain from reading this article that were useful to you?

While the study results were well-supported and more than addressed the proposed research questions, I must admit that I personally found the literature review most insightful. The review was a detailed, yet very accessible, introduction to models of entrepreneurial engineering education and the benefits of incorporating experiential education into these models. The review provided insight into different approaches that I could take when engaging in discussions of entrepreneurial experiential education with different audiences, which I was immediately able to put into practice.

Does this study raise questions for you that require further research/investigation?

One area of future exploration that I felt could have been emphasized was the impact of the entrepreneurial ecosystems associated with the experiential activities students engaged in. The literature review pointed to the importance of the environment (i.e. local/regional culture, access to mentors and networks, etc.) as an influencer of the model of entrepreneurial program models an institution may adopt. It occurs to me that the degree to which experiential activities intersect with ecosystems outside of the classroom or program experience curated by the institution, could impact the effectiveness of these activities in meeting entrepreneurial program objectives. For example, I wonder to what extent the experience for students working with industry or community incubators would differ from those engaging in similar activities associated with classroom or other campus environments.


Article #2: Examining the effect of co-op non-employment and rejection sensitivity on subjective wellbeing (2017)

Author

Lauren Cormier and Dave Drewery

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 18(3), 213-224

Source

Work-Integrated Learning Research Portal

Purpose

To address the negative effect of co-op unemployment on subjective well-being (SWB) and the potential moderating effect of students’ rejection sensitivity using an integrated framework of SWB.

Methodology

Two self-report surveys were administered before and after first work-term students learned of their employment results.

Key findings

Unemployed students showed significantly negative effects on SWB compared to their employed peers. Rejection sensitivity was identified as a moderator of this effect.

 

Practitioner’s thoughts by

Kaitlyn Kraatz (Career Advisor, Co-operative Education and Career Action, University of Waterloo)

What insights did you gain from reading this article that were useful to you?

My most important insight from this article is the value of the work that my co-op facing colleagues do around unemployed student management. They contact unemployed students at cardinal moments in Waterloo’s hiring cycle and ensure they have the information they need to find work. This connection between students and co-operative education services is an important part of the way that we build positive relationships.

How might the results of this work impact how you do your job?

This study reinforces that I might be meeting students whose self esteem is affected by their university experience in any number of ways. It reminds me to slow down and take the time to understand my students’ needs, even when I only have fifteen minutes.