CEWIL Research Matters: September 2018

Article #1: Rethinking the expert: Co-creating curriculum to support international work-integrated learning with community development organizations (2018)

Author 

Hammersley, L., Lloyd, K., & Bilous, R

Journal 

Asia Pacific Viewpoint, 59(2), 201-211

Source 

Work-Integrated Learning Research Portal

Purpose

To underscore the need for curriculum targeting students travelling overseas to participate in work-integrated learning (WIL) placements with community development organizations.

Methodology

A critical reflection on the importance of engaging with diverse knowledge frameworks and a description of an example of a community-based development module.

Key findings

University-community partnerships have the potential to develop appropriate and effective curriculum to help students understand community development principles and intercultural engagement.

 

Practitioner's thoughts by

Shabnam Surjitsingh Ivkovic (Manager, International Mobility, Co-operative Education, University of Waterloo)

How might the results of this work impact how the international team grows and manages co-op work terms abroad?

The first thing that struck me was the goal of “encourage(ing) students to rethink western-dominated understandings of development, poverty and inequality” (p.g 205). The International team has put resources into place to impress upon students that the transformative value of the experience abroad is greater than just the work they do at their workplace. As a student from a Canadian institution working in the destination country, they are investing themselves and their talents there. We encourage them to reflect on whether they had an opportunity to elevate the socio-economic ecosystem. But, it is evident that we need to do more work in helping them understand development, poverty and inequality in reference to their destination, not through the lens of their western way of life and experiences.

In what ways do these findings have the potential to continue to evolve practice for us at Waterloo?

1) Co-op students fill a debrief survey at the end of the work term about their motivators, cultural exposure and skills gained. This survey should be revised with more focus on the cultural competencies piece to facilitate deeper reflection on intercultural engagement; 2) As our university focuses more on indigenous partnerships, the learnings of ‘reciprocity, responsibility and respect’ (p.g 208) properly socialized can further reinforce positive and influential outcomes.


Article #2: Developing global standards framework and quality integrated models for cooperative and work-integrated education programs (2016)

Author

Khampirat, B., & McRae, N

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Co-operative Education, 17(4), 349-362

Source

Work-Integrated Learning Research Portal

Purpose

To propose a framework for establishing quality standards for co-operative and work-integrated education programs across the globe.

Methodology

A qualitative study of global practitioners and researchers’ perspectives.

Key findings

The quality standards framework is presented as sets of processes, procedures, outcomes and assessments (PPOA) that occur at three different times: before, during and after WIL experiences for the three key stakeholder groups (student, employer and institution).

 

Practitioner’s thoughts by

Judene Pretti (Director, WatCACE, University of Waterloo)

What insights did you gain from reading this article that were useful to you?

In reviewing this article, I became even more appreciative for the leadership of Co-operative Education and Work-Integrated Learning (CEWIL) Canada and its visionary work (as CAFCE) in establishing an accreditation process, 39 years ago. Almost all of the practices included in the PPOA quality standards framework align with the practices of our co-op programs in Canada. It also made me think about some of the features of Waterloo co-op that aren’t captured in this framework, for example, the competitive job search/match process, and think about the contribution of those practices to the quality of our program.

How might the results of this work impact how you do your job?

The PPOA framework would be a really useful tool for reviewing WIL programs and thinking about continuous improvement activities. I look forward to being part of the conversation at Waterloo and within CEWIL Canada about how we can build on the work described in this article to create a quality assurance framework that could be used for all WIL programs in Canada.