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Passive microwave imagery of a tropical storm near 118 GHz thermal and precipitation structure

TitlePassive microwave imagery of a tropical storm near 118 GHz thermal and precipitation structure
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsSchwartz, M. J., J. W. Barrett, P. Fieguth, P. W. Rosenkranz, M. S. Spina, and D. H. Staelin
Conference NameIGARSS '94
Keywords118 GHz, 118.75 GHz, AD 1993 02 07, airborne remote sensing, atmosphere, atmospheric techniques, atmospheric temperature, brightness temperature, Coral Sea, double-sideband channels, EHF mm wave millimetric radiometry, eyewall, measurement technique, meteorology, microwave image, millimetre wave measurement, passive microwave imagery, precipitation structure, radiometry, rain, Remote Sensing, storm, storms, strong convection, tropical cyclone, tropical storm, warm core
Abstract

An imaging microwave radiometer with eight double-sideband channels centered on the 118.75-GHz (1-)oxygen resonance was flown on a NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft over a tropical cyclone in the Coral Sea, east of Australia. An eyewall of strong convection and a warm core within the eye are clearly visible. Brightness temperatures observed within the eye are approximately 10K warmer than those observed in clear air 100 km away. This warming extends somewhat beyond the eyewall in the highest (most opaque) channel. Two passes three hours apart may reveal a slight weakening of the convective activity. This flight provides the first known calibrated high-resolution 18.75 GHz imagery of a tropical storm. Temperature profiles and cloud-top altitudes may be inferred from the data

DOI10.1109/IGARSS.1994.399760