The results are in! Canadians and global citizens share views on climate change and energy.

Thursday, October 1, 2015

A total of 10,000 citizens from 76 countries talk climate change and energy

World Wide Views on Climate and Energy was the largest-ever global citizen consultation held on climate and energy. In June of this year, thousands of citizens from around the world came together for all-day discussions on the same climate and energy issues, including fossil exploration, carbon pricing and global responsibilities. The University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs led 1 of 97 worldwide debates with the participation of more than 100 diverse Canadian citizens.

The international report was released on September 26th in New York at a General Assembly of the United Nations. The results from the global citizen consultations on climate change and energy are clear: there is strong public support for political action in order to agree on reducing greenhouse gas emissions to limit the global temperature increase to 2 degrees Celsius. While 89% of global citizens want climate change to be a national priority, 97% want a global agreement to include long-term goals for zero emissions by the end of this century. 

The Canadian results also show support for international climate action, and national and provincial-level policies. Canadians were aware that, as a nation, Canada has not done enough to address climate change and shared their support for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and cutting fossil fuel subsidies.

This global conversation was initiated by the Danish Board of Technology Foundation, as well as Missions Publiques, with the support of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to engage and include the views of average citizens on global climate policymaking. World Wide Views results can be explored at their website and will be presented at this year’s United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP21) in Paris.

Take a look at a visual summary of Canadian views on climate change and energy issues below or browse this interactive map displaying the global results.

World Wide Views Infographic

  1. 2021 (22)
    1. May (1)
    2. April (5)
    3. March (5)
    4. February (6)
    5. January (5)
  2. 2020 (41)
    1. December (7)
    2. November (5)
    3. October (4)
    4. September (5)
    5. August (3)
    6. July (2)
    7. June (2)
    8. May (3)
    9. April (3)
    10. March (3)
    11. February (2)
    12. January (2)
  3. 2019 (17)
    1. October (2)
    2. September (1)
    3. August (1)
    4. July (2)
    5. June (2)
    6. May (1)
    7. April (6)
    8. January (2)
  4. 2018 (8)
  5. 2017 (9)
  6. 2016 (10)
  7. 2015 (14)
  8. 2014 (4)
  9. 2013 (1)
  10. 2012 (1)