Course subject: History (HIST)

For more detailed course information, click on a course title below.

History (HIST) 601 Canadian History I (0.50) LEC,SEM

Course ID: 001560

History (HIST) 602 Canadian History II (0.50) LEC

Course ID: 001559

History (HIST) 603 Nationalism and Ethnic Policies of Multinational States (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 012549
The course explores the concept of nationalism and the responses of multiethnic states to nationalist challenge. Students will examine theories of nationalism and discuss its creative and destructive potential. Pursuit of national self-determination led to the birth of new states and the disintegration of old ones: ethnic tensions were another product of nationalism. Different types of states have addressed ethnic problems in different ways: some have sought to maintain harmonious multicultural communities: others have preferred to assimilate or segregate minorities; yet others have engaged in ethnic cleansing. We will trace the roots of nationalism and the consequences of its rise, and we will also discuss the impact of state system on the ethnic policy.

History (HIST) 604 Theory and Practice of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency: Historical and Contemporary Issues (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 001561
This seminar offers a comparative analysis of insurgency and counterinsurgency from the 19th century to the present. It examines resistance to foreign invaders in Europe, the century of rebellion in Mexico in 1810-1917, anti-colonial wars of national liberation, Marxist revolutionary movements in South-East Asia and Latin America, the upsurge of Islamic fundamentalism and urban guerrilla warfare. The course will focus on the sources of insurgencies, their nature and the support they drew from various social groups. In each case, the government's response will also be investigated. We will analyse theories of guerrilla thinkers and pacification models and pay particular attention to the gap between intended and actual policies, and the plight of civilians caught in crossfire.

History (HIST) 605 Global Governance in Historical Perspective (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 012550
This course examines the various ways global actors have identified and tried to solve global problems in the twentieth century. We will study the interactions between international organizations, state actors, non-governmental organizations, and informal interest groups as they have confronted global issues such as war, immigration, international trade, human rights, and environmental and health crises.

History (HIST) 606 International Development in Historical Perspective (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 012847
This course examines the theory of international development and how it has been applied in practice. As well, students will assess the records of various international actors in terms of their success or failure in providing development assistance. They will also study the interactions between international organizations, states, non-governmental organizations and more informal interest groups through their involvement in overseas development assistance. Finally, the role played by the Cold War in determining Overseas Development Assistance priorities will be examined.

History (HIST) 607 Human Rights in Historical Perspective I (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 012970
The course will examine developments in human rights, primarily during the twentieth century. Weekly discussions based on assigned readings will offer students an opportunity to explore such questions as: What are "human rights" and how are they different from any other rights? Where do human rights come from? Why do they change over time, and by whom and by what means are changes effected? Is there a role for the historian in explaining this process, and can the lessons of history be applied to public policy and to continuing human rights issues? The focus for our study is the formation and evolution of international human rights, but with attention paid to Canadian events to assess the relationship between domestic and global human rights innovations.

History (HIST) 608 Human Rights in Historical Perspective II (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 012971
In this sequel to HIST 607, students will have an opportunity to pursue a primary research project on an approved topic in the history of human rights. A series of progress meetings and research consultations will lead towards a "conference" where students will present their own research and comment on their classmates' draft papers.

History (HIST) 610 War and Society in the Twentieth Century (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 012181
This course will explore the impact of twentieth century war on the English - speaking world, especially Canada. It will introduce students to the many ways in which historians have studied the First and Second World Wars, as well as other conflicts. Our seminar presentations and research papers will sample the 'old military history' of tactics and strategy, and we will also examine the 'new military history' that focuses on the social, economic and cultural impact of war.

History (HIST) 611 War and Society in the Twentieth Century II (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 012177
History 611 forms the research component of the course. Students will write a research paper based on primary sources on a topic chosen with the professor's consultation. The paper will be approximately 30-35 pages in length (7500-9000 words). The class will meet throughout the term to discuss the process of research and writing. Each student will also present his or her working drafts to the class for discussion. Marks will be based on the quality of constructive comment raised in each class, as well as on the final paper submitted at term's end.

History (HIST) 612 Indigenous Rights and Claims: A Global Perspective (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 001568
This course examines the historical and political background of Indigenous rights in comparative and global perspective. It will consider the patterns of Indigenous-Newcomer relations, the nature and origins of treaties, and Indigenous protests against external incursions into traditional territories. The course will focus on developments around the world in the period after World War II, and will examine such themes as the emergence of Indigenous rights movements, the origins and status of legal claims, political accommodations and international efforts to address Indigenous aspirations. Particular attention will be paid to the development of international Indigenous organizations, coordinated protests and challenges to national governments, and the engagement of international organizations (i.e., through the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).

History (HIST) 614 Space, Identity and Culture: Reading in Canadian Social History (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 013344
In this course you will master both classic and cutting-edge historical scholarship in Canadian Social History. You will read works that interrogate and historicize the traditional foci of social historians - class gender and race. You will read works informed by cultural theory, especially concerning the occupation of social space and the expression of experience of particularized social identities. Each week, we will meet together in seminar to discuss the substance, theoretical orientation, methodology, and historiographical significance of the assigned material. As such, active reading and constructive participation in seminar are key. In addition, you will be required to lead seminar discussions and write an historiographical paper.

History (HIST) 620 Early Modern History I (0.50) LEC,SEM

Course ID: 001578

History (HIST) 621 Early Modern History II (0.50) LEC

Course ID: 001579

History (HIST) 622 Microhistory and the Lost Peoples of Europe (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 013808
This course borrows its title from the famous collection of essays edited by Edward Muir and Guido Ruggiero. The course explores how historians use narrative to (re)construct past realities. It looks closely at the uses, abuses, and limitations of microhistory as a genre and exposes students to important trends in social history. Though the bulk of the material deals with Europe in the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries, the course is methodological in nature and is intended for all graduate students of social history. Students in HIST 622 read the great microhistories including Davis' The Return of Martin Guerre, LeRoy Ladurie's Montaillou and Caranaval at Romans, Spence's The Death of Woman Wang, Ginzburg's Night Battles, and others. Through these sources students acquire a deep understanding of the historiography surrounding this genre. In addition, HIST 622 exposes students to the various non-historical theorists (sociological, anthropological, etc.) whose works inform the microhistorical method.

History (HIST) 624 Environmental & Climate History, Premodern (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 015923
This course introduces graduate students to the major authors, works, and themes of preindustrial environmental and climate history. It demonstrates how historians frame the historical interaction of mutable human culture and natural environment. The locus of study is western Europe, the period between the end of antiquity and the start of the industrial revolution. Each week, students will read assigned texts and discuss them in a seminar format. Ultimately, each student must write a final research essay.

History (HIST) 626 Modern European History I (0.50) LEC

Course ID: 001582

History (HIST) 627 Modern European History II (0.50) LEC,SEM

Course ID: 001583

History (HIST) 632 History of the United States I (0.50) LEC,SEM

Course ID: 001590

History (HIST) 635 Race in Modern History I (0.50) LEC

Course ID: 001592

History (HIST) 636 Race in Modern History II (0.50) LEC

Course ID: 001593

History (HIST) 640 Digital History (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 015922
Digital history, the application of new and emerging technologies to the study of history, is an important field that has begun to reshape historical production and scholarship. This graduate level course introduces students to the literature on digital history, and then puts theory into practice by digitally collecting, publishing, and producing new historical knowledge with cutting-edge tools.

History (HIST) 660 Transnational and Global History: Old Problems and New Directions (0.50) SEM

Course ID: 014737
This course examines transnational and global historical processes, focusing on temporal and geographic scales of analysis outside of traditional national histories, and promotes linking the local and the global. It looks at global forces influencing particular societies and encourages students to place themselves outside conventional local, regional, and national boundaries, and will critically consider a number of the metanarratives that have informed and continue to inform historiography, particularly idea such as modernity, progress, and the ongoing preoccupation with the 'rise of the west'. Given these questions, and the almost endless scope of a course that purports to take the world as its focal point, weekly seminars will begin with a discussion of the possibilities offered by as well as the limits to transnational/global/world history, the various interpretative frameworks in use and their proponents as well as the challenges that transnational/global/world history poses. We will then focus on particular case studies or themes so as to promote discussion that is as much historiographical as it is historical. Such themes/case studies may include: feminism and imperialism, famine and climate change, disease and ecology, military technology and governmentally, global trade and the rise of consumer society(s), colonial knowledge and shifting ideas of race.

History (HIST) 691A Directed Studies (0.50) RDG

Course ID: 001615

History (HIST) 691B Directed Studies (0.50) RDG

Course ID: 001616

History (HIST) 691C Directed Studies (0.50) RDG

Course ID: 001617

History (HIST) 719 War and Society Major Field (1) SEM

Course ID: 012972
This field will attract those who are interested in the impact of military conflict, in conventional and non-conventional forms, on civil society. It will focus in particular on the two World Wars and the "small wars" that developed in the last part of the twentieth century, and be flexible enough to include a range of related topics across time and place that reflect the interests of faculty and students.

History (HIST) 725 Cold War Era History Major Field (1) SEM

Course ID: 013809
Major field seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor. During the subsequent Spring term major field participants read a further 50 books selected by the instructor in consultation with each participant's supervisor.

History (HIST) 726 Medieval History Major Field (1) SEM

Course ID: 013810
Major field seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor. During the subsequent Spring term major field participants read a further 50 books selected by the instructor in consultation with each participant's supervisor.

History (HIST) 727 World History Major Field (1) SEM

Course ID: 013811
Major field seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor. During the subsequent Spring term major field participants read a further 50 books selected by the instructor in consultation with each participant's supervisor.

History (HIST) 728 Indigenous History Major Field (1) SEM

Course ID: 015738
Major field seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor. During the subsequent Spring term major field participants read a further 50 books selected by the instructor in consultation with each participant's supervisor.

History (HIST) 771 Minor Area of Concentration (1) SEM

Course ID: 001644
This minor area is arranged between the student and a professor, and falls outside of those other minor areas enumerated in the calendar. The participants will provide the department and the Graduate Studies Office with a course name, which will appear on the student's transcript, in order to more specifically identify the minor area

History (HIST) 775 Cold War Era History Minor Area Seminar (1) SEM

Course ID: 013812
Minor area seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor.

History (HIST) 776 Medieval History Minor Area Seminar (1) SEM

Course ID: 013813
Minor area seminars meet bi-weekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor.

History (HIST) 777 World History Minor Area Seminar (1) SEM

Course ID: 013814
Minor area seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor.

History (HIST) 778 Indigenous History Minor Area Seminar (1) SEM

Course ID: 015925
Minor area seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor.