Info session: Utilizing public data for decision-makingExport this event to calendar

Wednesday, September 28, 2022 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

Thank you to everyone who joined our info session.
Please watch the recording of this event below.


The amount of data we collect and can access is greater than ever before, and leveraging modern tools and techniques to draw insights from this data is imperative. Any organization, from businesses and academia to research institutes and industry groups, can benefit from using public data sets to improve decision-making.

Join our free info session on September 28 at 12 p.m., where you'll learn about:

  • the current data market and how data-driven decision-making is being adopted across a wide variety of industries and organizations
  • how Canadian public data can be used
  • the top skills and tools you need to successfully analyze large sets of data
  • a case study specific to Canadian public data

You'll also learn how our Data Analytics for Behavioural Insights certificate program can help you expand your knowledge of extracting insights for informed decision-making. 


Your info session speaker

Anindya Sen headshotANINDYA SEN, PhD

Anindya Sen is the lead author of the Data Analytics for Behavioural Insights Program. Sen is professor of economics, director of the Master of Public Service (MPS) program, and acting associate dean of co-operative education and planning at the University of Waterloo. He is also the director of Computational Data Analytics for the Social Sciences and Humanities (CDASH). Prior to joining the University of Waterloo, Sen was an economist at the Competition Bureau of Canada.

His research focuses on the economics of public policy, with an emphasis on estimating the statistical effects of government intervention and imperfectly competitive market structures. He has published research on the effects of government policies on COVID-19 cases, the relationship between market concentration and gasoline prices, the impacts of higher cigarette taxes on smoking, the effects of higher minimum wages on employment and poverty, and the consequences of incentive programs on electricity usage. These papers have been published in peer reviewed journals such as the Canadian Journal of Economics, Journal of Law and Economics, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Regulatory Economics, International Review of Law and Economics, Labour Economics, and Canadian Public Policy. His work has been extensively covered by the Globe and Mail, the Financial Post, CBC, and the Toronto Star.

 

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