Posts for the Topic grammar

The power of synonyms: the good, the bad, and the in-between

Man sitting at a desk with his laptop and his notebook beside him.

When it comes to writing, every word has an impact and brings meaning along with it. In our assignments, our job is to take these different meanings and weave them together to be clear, engaging, and provide information to our audiences. Yet, when we get stumped or feel like our work is getting too repetitive, we turn to Google or Microsoft Word to help find synonyms. Sometimes this can work wonders, but other times it can have negative repercussions.

If punctuation marks were people

Cartoon dash saying, "But wait—there's more!"

Punctuation marks. We use them to form our sentences, to turn our incoherent thoughts into organized prose. But what if these signs and symbols had minds of their own?

How to be chill about "which" vs. "that"

Banner featuring an ice cream cone and the title of the blog

When I stepped into my role as a Peer Tutor for the Writing and Communication Centre, I came to a profound realization.

Despite speaking English for most of my life, there is still so much I don’t know.

Improve your writing with three easy revisions

two people working together with laptops

Many students come to the Writing and Communication Centre to see if their writing flows well. Most of the time these students don’t know why, but they feel as though their writing is hard to follow. Here are the top three reasons your work may seem confusing to the reader. 

Affect vs Effect

affect vs effect banner

6 letters, 2 consonants, and a whole lot of confusion. When the moment to use affect/effect comes, it is often followed by uncertainty and confusion. NO MORE I SAY. Here are some easy tips on how to quickly and painlessly decide which of these words to use.

Oxford commas: what’s the whole fuss about?

The Oxford comma, also known as the serial comma, is one of those writing conventions in English that people either love or hate. If you were one of the lucky few in high school to have an English teacher who was particularly passionate about the subject, then you probably know what I’m talking about. The most important thing to know about the Oxford comma is that it isn’t a clear cut grammar rule. In other words, it is what one could call “optional punctuation”.

The grammar of things: A (hopefully) logical digression

Grammar is a tricky, uh, thing?

Pages

Blog topics

  1. 2020 (15)
    1. August (1)
    2. July (3)
    3. June (5)
    4. May (3)
    5. April (1)
    6. March (1)
    7. January (1)
  2. 2019 (26)
    1. November (1)
    2. July (1)
    3. June (1)
    4. May (4)
    5. April (5)
    6. March (4)
    7. February (5)
    8. January (5)
  3. 2018 (49)
    1. December (3)
    2. November (4)
    3. October (4)
    4. September (3)
    5. August (4)
    6. July (4)
    7. June (5)
    8. May (5)
    9. April (4)
    10. March (4)
    11. February (4)
    12. January (5)
  4. 2017 (28)
    1. November (2)
    2. October (1)
    3. August (4)
    4. July (4)
    5. June (3)
    6. May (1)
    7. April (3)
    8. March (4)
    9. February (4)
    10. January (2)
  5. 2016 (37)
    1. December (2)
    2. November (6)
    3. October (5)
    4. September (4)
    5. July (3)
    6. June (1)
    7. April (3)
    8. March (5)
    9. February (7)
    10. January (1)
  6. 2015 (20)