Water Institute member joins editorial team of new PLOS Water journal

Monday, August 23, 2021

Water Institute member Monica Emelko, Canada Research Chair in Water Science, Technology and Policy, and professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has recently been named section editor for Weather and Climate Change for the new peer-reviewed, open access journal, PLOS Water. 

PLOS Water brings together research of the highest standards for water as a vital human resource for communities in every region of the world. Topics covered include:

  • water sanitation and hygiene
  • sustainable water consumption, management, and supply
  • resource recovery and utilization
  • applied water governance and policy
  • socio-behavioural research

The broad scope of this new journal breaks down silos between disciplines and sectors to facilitate collaboration across the interconnected issues of water resources management and clean water supply. Focused on Open Science, PLOS Water supports giving access to everyone who plays a role in the global issue of water —including organizations, industry-leaders, local and Indigenous communities, and all members of the public—with unrestricted access to the quality-driven science in order to drive change.

Professor Monica Emelko seated at a microscope.Professor Emelko responded to the section editor nomination, sharing “I am honoured to be named the section editor for Weather and Climate Change with PLOS Water. It has provided groundbreaking leadership and rigor in open access science that is delivered with integrity.”

Emelko’s research focuses on drinking water treatment, public health protection, and climate change adaptation. She shares “the importance of hygiene and sanitation cannot be over-stated. Technological advancement in this domain reduced infectious diseases as a major cause of death by over 3000 per cent between 1900 and 2010.” Emelko continues “Climate change is demonstrably threatening these public health gains because it threatens the provision of safe drinking water not only because of drought, but also changes to drinking water source quality.”

For more information on PLOS Water please visit https://journals.plos.org/water/

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