Enhancing function and control through leading research in lower limb mobility

The Biomechanics of Human Mobility Laboratory is home to a team of innovative researchers who aim to improve people's quality of life by studying how balance, mobility, and joint mechanics interact with disease state, occupational exposures, environment, and aging.

Our research focuses on two main themes:

  • Knee mechanics and osteoarthritis
  • Occupational biomechanics

We use a variety of biomechanical tools to study the mechanics of human movement. The laboratory infrastructure includes a suite of six optoelectronic motion capture camera banks (Optotrak, Northern Digital Inc.), force plates, wireless Electromyography (EMG), accelerometers, and exercise machines.

Seeking participants

Our graduate student researchers will soon be starting a number of exciting research studies which can be viewed on our projects page. Each study will list the principle investigator, who you can contact to find out more and to see if you are eligible. To join our participant pool for future projects, please complete our volunteer form.

By participating in our research you will be making an important contribution to our efforts to better understand the biomechanics of human mobility.

  1. June 11, 2019David Kingston PhD Convocation

    The BOHM lab is happy to congratulate Dr. David Kingston for convocating on June 11th, 201.

  2. May 2, 2019BOHM Lab at the OARSI 2019 World Congress

    The BOHM lab attended the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) 2019 World Congress held in Toronto, ON. MSc student Natasha Ivanochko and PhD candidate Annemarie Laudanski both had poster presentations.

  3. Feb. 1, 2019New Publication in JEK

    The BOHM lab has a new publication!

Read all news

Meet our people

Jessa Buchman-Pearle

Jessa Buchman-Pearle

MSc Student - Professor Stacey Acker

Jessa Buchman-Pearle is completing her MSc in biomechanics. Her research interests include occupational biomechanics, with an emphasis on injury and disease mechanisms. Currently, she is researching improvements for motion capture data acquisition during postures which require deep knee flexion, like squatting and kneeling.