Tuesday, October 24, 2017 — 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM EDT

Jorn Diedrichsen
Brain and Mind Institute
University of Western Ontario

The Brain’s GPU? In Search of the Cerebellum’s Universal Transform

The cerebellum exhibits a highly specialized and uniform neuronal circuitry, which likely evolved to solve very specific problems in sensory-motor control. In the human brain, the cerebellar circuitry has dramatically expanded, and it contributes here to virtually every possible cognitive function. But what is this elusive computation that the cerebellum contributes to cortical processing? I will show some insights from our research on motor control and learning, which shows that the cerebellum is critically involved in prediction and fast error-based learning. I will then talk about the first steps that we have recently taken to test computational theories about the function of the cerebellum across different cognitive domains using functional imaging.

Location 
PAS - Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology
Room 2464
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

Waterloo researchers among top in Canada

Chris Eliasmith writing on a whiteboardChris Eliasmith, Director of the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience, received the prestigious John C. Polanyi Award  and is also an inaugural member of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

S M T W T F S
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
  1. 2019 (5)
    1. October (1)
    2. September (1)
    3. May (1)
    4. April (1)
    5. March (1)
  2. 2018 (4)
    1. April (1)
    2. March (2)
    3. January (1)
  3. 2017 (7)
  4. 2016 (8)
  5. 2015 (9)
  6. 2014 (6)
  7. 2013 (8)
  8. 2012 (4)

How to Build a Brain

Chris Eliasmith’s team at the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience has built Spaun, the world’s largest simulation of a functioning brain. The related book is now available and for the full article Waterloo Stories.

Nengo

This is a collection of coverage of work with Nengo (Neural Engineering Objects) that has appeared in the popular press recently.