Tuesday, November 7, 2017 — 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM EST

Mariam Aly
Columbia University

Perception and Attention in Memory Systems

Research in cognitive neuroscience has traditionally progressed by studying different components of cognition largely in isolation. But, ultimately, complex behavior is the result of the interplay between multiple aspects of cognition at the behavioral and the neural levels. With a combination of behavioral, neuroimaging (fMRI) and patient studies, I’ll argue that the computations performed by brain regions allow them to critically and flexibly support many different aspects of cognition, from attention to perception to long-term memory. In the first part of my talk, I’ll show that at a behavioral level, perception shares functional commonalities with long-term memory, and traditional memory systems of the brain play a critical role in perception. In the second part of my talk, I’ll show that attention modulates these “memory systems”, and that this modulation has consequences for attentional and mnemonic behavior. Together, my research points to the utility of understanding the brain and behavior by thinking about the mechanisms that allow any given brain region to flexibly contribute to diverse aspects of cognition.

Location 
PAS - Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology
Room 2464
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

Waterloo researchers among top in Canada

Chris Eliasmith writing on a whiteboardChris Eliasmith, Director of the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience, received the prestigious John C. Polanyi Award  and is also an inaugural member of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

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How to Build a Brain

Chris Eliasmith’s team at the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience has built Spaun, the world’s largest simulation of a functioning brain. The related book is now available and for the full article Waterloo Stories.

Nengo

This is a collection of coverage of work with Nengo (Neural Engineering Objects) that has appeared in the popular press recently.