Tuesday, October 19, 2021 — 2:30 PM EDT

Talk Title
Towards a neurally mechanistic understanding of visual cognition.

Abstract
I am interested in developing a neurally mechanistic understanding of how primate brains represent the world through its visual system and how such representations enable a remarkable set of intelligent behaviors. In this talk, I will primarily highlight aspects of my current research that focuses on dissecting the brain circuits that support core object recognition behavior (primates’ ability to categorize objects within hundreds of milliseconds) in non-human primates and that the primate ventral stream requires fast recurrent processing via ventrolateral PFC for robust core object recognition (Kar and DiCarlo, Neuron, 2021).

Short Bio
Kohitij Kar (“Ko”) is currently a Research Scientist at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT working in the lab of Dr. James DiCarlo. He is also an incoming Assistant Professor at York University. He completed his Ph.D. in the Department of Behavioral and Neural Sciences at Rutgers University in New Jersey (PhD advisor: Bart Krekelberg).

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