Friday, November 15, 2019

Waterloo medical startup wins first Entrepreneurship World Cup

A medical technology startup co-founded by two Waterloo Engineering students topped more than 100,000 applicants to take first place and the $500,000 prize in an international competition staged in Saudi Arabia.

NERv Technology, which is based out of the Velocity Garage in downtown Kitchener, won the Entrepreneurship World Cup (EWC) following a startup boot camp and several rounds of competition in Riyadh.

Monday, November 11, 2019

Scientists develop sensor to save children, pets left in vehicles

A small, inexpensive sensor could save lives by triggering an alarm when children or pets are left alone in vehicles.

The new device, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, combines radar technology with artificial intelligence (AI) to detect unattended children or animals with 100-per-cent accuracy.

Monday, November 4, 2019

Scientists create 'artificial leaf' that turns carbon dioxide into fuel

Scientists have created an “artificial leaf” to fight climate change by inexpensively converting harmful carbon dioxide (CO2) into a useful alternative fuel.

The new technology, outlined in a paper published today in the journal Nature Energy, was inspired by the way plants use energy from sunlight to turn carbon dioxide into food.

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Report outlines measures to protect commercial real estate owners against floods

The Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation is aiming to give Canada’s commercial real estate a safe harbour ahead of a growing storm.

The University of Waterloo research centre has developed a comprehensive report outlining 20 measures that can be implemented by commercial real estate owners and managers to enhance flood resilience.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

New way to wrap liquid drops could improve drug delivery

Researchers have developed a faster, cheaper way to coat liquid medication, an invention that could improve how drugs are delivered in the body.

The new encapsulation technology, developed by engineers at the University of Waterloo, uses gravity and other natural forces to wrap drops as they fall through a thin layer of liquid shell floating on a base liquid.

Once hardened, or cured, by exposure to ultraviolet light, the shell houses and protects the liquid core inside.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

New way to wrap liquid drops could improve drug delivery

Researchers have developed a faster, cheaper way to coat liquid medication, an invention that could improve how drugs are delivered in the body.

The new encapsulation technology, developed by engineers at the University of Waterloo, uses gravity and other natural forces to wrap drops as they fall through a thin layer of liquid shell floating on a base liquid.

Once hardened, or cured, by exposure to ultraviolet light, the shell houses and protects the liquid core inside.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Rising emissions are turning arctic permafrost into a carbon source, research shows

Arctic regions have captured and stored carbon for tens of thousands of years, but a new study shows winter carbon emissions from the Arctic may now be putting more carbon into the atmosphere than is taken up by plants each year. 

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks

Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. 

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Waterloo, University of Maryland and Yale’s School of Public Health. 

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

AI system more accurately identifies collapsed lungs using chest x-rays

New assistive technology can diagnose collapsed lungs from chest x-rays with a higher degree of accuracy than radiologists.

The system, developed at the University of Waterloo, uses artificial intelligence (AI) software to search a huge database of x-ray images with known diagnoses for comparison to x-rays of new patients with unknown conditions.

That approach enables researchers to identify 75 per cent of cases of collapsed lungs, or pneumothorax. On average, medical specialists diagnose fewer than 50 per cent of cases when chest x-rays are used.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Research highlights importance of religious vote amid changing social landscape

Canadians who consider religion to be important in their lives were still more likely to vote for the Conservative Party in 2015, finds new research from the University of Waterloo. This religion effect on voting behaviour is one of the strongest sociodemographic effects on vote choice in Canada.
 

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