Wednesday, February 19, 2020

AI agrees with mom: take good care of yourself

Analysis by researchers at the University of Waterloo using artificial intelligence (AI) supports the conventional wisdom that taking care of yourself makes you feel good.
 
Researchers built an AI computer model to identify key words in more than 700,000 anonymous online journal entries written by over 67,000 users of a mobile mood-tracking application. They found strong associations between positive moods and getting enough sleep, eating well and exercising.
 

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Lack of images on cigarette pack warnings and partial smoke-free laws are ineffective in Japan

The tobacco control policies of Japan, the world’s ninth largest cigarette market and host of the 2020 Olympics, are not working, according to new studies from researchers at the University of Waterloo.

The two studies were part of the Waterloo-based International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC) and involved a survey of 3,800 smokers in Japan. Waterloo researchers collaborated with researchers in Japan on both studies, which are the first national-level evaluations of Japan’s efforts to reduce smoking.

Friday, February 14, 2020

Differences in airway size develop during puberty, new study finds

Sex differences in airway size are not innate, but likely develop because of hormonal changes around puberty, reports a new study by the University of Waterloo.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Storytelling can reduce VR cybersickness

A storyline with emotionally evocative details can reduce virtual reality cybersickness for some people, according to a new study.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

New sensor provides better leak protection in buildings

A new, battery-free sensor can detect water leaks in buildings at a fraction of the cost of existing systems.

The tiny device, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses nanotechnology to power itself and send an alert to smartphones when exposed to moisture.

By eliminating a battery and related circuitry, researchers estimate their sensor could be commercially produced for $1 each, about a tenth of the cost of current leak detection devices on the market.

Friday, February 7, 2020

Few consumers understand THC levels in cannabis edibles

Few cannabis consumers understand what the THC numbers on packages of cannabis edibles really mean, according to a new University of Waterloo study. 

The study, which surveyed nearly 1,000 Canadians aged 16 to 30, found that most consumers could not identify whether a cannabis edible contained ‘low’ or ‘high’ levels of THC based on the label. 

The researchers also found that descriptive information, such as symbols and words, are more effective in helping consumers understand THC potency and approximate serving sizes for cannabis products. 

Thursday, February 6, 2020

At least 13% of wastewater treated by Southern Ontario septic systems ends up in streams

The presence of artificial sweeteners has revealed that at least 13 percent of septic system wastewater from rural Southern Ontario homes eventually makes its way into local streams.

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Waterloo used the presence of artificial sweeteners excreted from humans to identify the wastewater content in streams across rural Southern Ontario.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Computer servers now able to retrieve data much faster

Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have found a novel approach that significantly improves the storage efficiency and output speed of computer systems. 

Current data storage systems use only one storage server to process information, making them slow to retrieve information to display for the user. A backup server only becomes active if the main storage server fails. 

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Waves of migrants escaping sea level rise could flood urban centres inland

On the heels of a recent warning from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees that climate change will force millions around the world to relocate away from coastal areas, a new study co-authored by a University of Waterloo researcher offers the first clear tool to predict where these climate migrants could move to, and how this will affect communities.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

UWaterloo creates memorial funds to honour victims of Iran plane crash

The University of Waterloo has created a scholarship and memorial fund to honour the memories of members of the university community who died in the crash of Ukrainian International Airlines Flight PS752 in Iran.

Among the people with ties to Canada who died were Waterloo PhD students Marzieh (Mari) Foroutan and Mansour Esnaashary Esfahani, alumnus Mojgan Daneshmand (PhD ’06), her husband Pedram Moussavi (a former Waterloo postdoctoral fellow) and their two young children, Daria and Dorina, as well as former student Dr. Neda Saddighi. 

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