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Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Floating a new approach to cope with floods: Conference brings together experts in amphibious architecture

Elizabeth English beside Grand River

The second International Conference on Amphibious Architecture, Design and Engineering – hosted by Water Institute member and associate professor Elizabeth English – took place June 25-28, and brought together academics, practitioners, professionals and policymakers to discuss amphibious architecture.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Interview with Larry Swatuk, author of Water in Southern Africa

water in south africa

Water Institute member and professor in the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development, Larry Swatuk, is the author of a new book titled “Water in Southern Africa.” 

Larry lived for 14 years in Africa, primarily in Botswana, where he was a lecturer at the University of Botswana and associate professor of Resource Governance at the Okavango Research Institute. He has published extensively on issues pertaining to the ‘wise use’ of the resources of the Okavango River basin.

Friday, June 16, 2017

As the floods come, who should pay the price for preparation?

Water Institute members in the media

While a lot of noise is made about preventing floods by banning construction and rebuilding in flood zones, many existing neighbourhoods need protection and not relocation.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Water Institute members lead impactful projects on climate change

Climate change is significantly impacting Canada’s water resources. From melting permafrost, to more pervasive algal blooms, to increased flooding, these impacts are only expected to increase in the future. Three professors from the University of Waterloo’s Water Institute have been awarded significant grants to develop new, innovative technologies and to deliver new management approaches to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of Canada’s water resources in the face of climate change.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Interview with Canada Research Chair in Environmental Microbiology, Laura Hug

Water Institute member Laura Hug, is an assistant professor in the Department of Biology and leads the Hug Research group as they explore the microbial diversity that exists in contaminated environments – specifically landfills.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Taking on Lake Erie’s Algae Monster: A look inside AquaHacking 2017

Jason Deglint

AquaHacking 2017 has officially kicked off at the University of Waterloo. Bringing together water experts, engineers, digital designers and entrepreneurs, this multi-stage hackathon encourages creative minds to work together to develop technology that will positively impact Lake Erie.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Water Institute scientists lead $1.9M project to help farmers reduce their greenhouse gas emissions

Members of Parliament Raj Saini, Marwan Tabbara, Bardish Chagger with Professors David Blowes, David Rudolph, Bernard Duncker

Today, University of Waterloo Earth scientists received a $1.9M grant from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to examine greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural systems, and the impacts of alternative land-use practices and beneficial management practices (BMPs) on greenhouse gases.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

$2M awarded to Water Institute researchers

Congratulations to Water Institute members Laura Hug and Janusz Pawliszyn, who will receive a combined total of $2M through the Canada Research Chairs (CRC) and Canada Foundation for Innovation’s John R. Evans Leaders Fund (JELF).

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Dams are major driver of global environmental change

Dam

Water reservoirs created by damming rivers could have significant impacts on the world’s carbon cycle and climate system that aren’t being accounted for, a new study concludes.

Friday, May 5, 2017

Flooding, flooding everywhere – do Canadians have insurance for it? Blair Feltmate head of Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation comments

Global news released a story today on the surprising lack of awareness among Canadian homeowners about flood compensation, and what Canadians can do to prepare for flooding. 

Researchers at the Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change and the Partners for Action research network at the University of Waterloo surveyed 2,300 homeowners who live in communities that the Government of Canada’s Flood Damage Reduction Program designated as flood-risk areas.

The study found that 94 percent of respondents are unaware of their risk and don’t know that recent government policy changes puts the onus on homeowners to insure their homes.

The story includes comments by Water Institute member Blair Feltmate, of the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development.