Tuesday, November 25, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM EST

Ben Thompson
University of Waterloo

Learning to See with a “Lazy Eye”; Harnessing Visual Cortex Plasticity to Treat Amblyopia

Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of the visual cortex that is often considered to be untreatable in adulthood due to insufficient neural plasticity. I will present a series of studies which indicate that both binocular perceptual learning and non-invasive brain stimulation techniques can improve visual function in adult patients with amblyopia, possibly by reducing inhibitory interactions within the visual cortex. I will also present new data from a recent study on the use of the anti-depressant drug citalopram to promote visual cortex plasticity in adults with amblyopia.

Location 
PAS - Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology
Room 2464
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

Waterloo researchers among top in Canada

Chris Eliasmith writing on a whiteboardChris Eliasmith, Director of the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience, received the prestigious John C. Polanyi Award  and is also an inaugural member of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

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How to Build a Brain

Chris Eliasmith’s team at the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience has built Spaun, the world’s largest simulation of a functioning brain. The related book is now available and for the full article Waterloo Stories.

Nengo

This is a collection of coverage of work with Nengo (Neural Engineering Objects) that has appeared in the popular press recently.