Lightweight, compact, efficient and powerful AI

From Amazon's Alexa to autonomous vehicles, artificial intelligence (AI) is quickly becoming part of everyone's lives in some form or another. 

Waterloo Engineering researchers are leading the way by both shaping and directing world-changing AI technology. Instead of relying on cloud computing power that can result in service, security and data privacy concerns, our experts are developing Operational AI.

Operational AI is lightweight and compact, with highly effective intelligence that relies on minimal computing power and energy requirements. Our researchers are developing innovative Operational AI technology in areas including medical diagnostics, self-driving vehicles, speech recognition and living architecture. 

Waterloo Engineering offers more high-level courses in AI than any other Canadian university and most in the U.S. And our students are in demand. Google alone hires dozens of our co-op students each term to work in their AI/deep learning teams.

  1. Aug. 1, 2018New system uses AI to find potholes in need of repair

    Governments may soon be able to use artificial intelligence (AI) to easily and cheaply detect problems with roads, bridges and buildings.

    A new AI software system developed by researchers at Waterloo Engineering automatically analyzes photographs taken by vehicle-mounted cameras to flag potholes, cracks and other defects.

  2. July 18, 2018AI technology could help protect water supplies

    Progress on new artificial intelligence (AI) technology could make monitoring at water treatment plants cheaper and easier and help safeguard public health.

    Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed AI software capable of identifying and quantifying different kinds of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, a threat to shut down water systems when it suddenly proliferates.

  3. June 28, 2018Researchers developing a prick-free glucose monitor

    People with diabetes would be able to monitor their blood sugar without drawing blood using a system that is now being developed at the University of Waterloo.

    In a recent study, a large research team led by Waterloo Engineering professor George Shaker combined radar and artificial intelligence (AI) technologies to detect changes in glucose levels without the need for painful finger pricks several times a day.

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