Posts for Future undergraduate students

Bell Let's Talk Day 2019

Bell Let's Talk, 30th of January 2019

Bell Let’s Talk is back this year, and you're invited to get engaged with the world’s largest conversation about mental health. On Wednesday, January 30th, Bell Let’s Talk Day will engage Canadians for the eighth time, to destigmatize mental health concerns.

Canada’s 2019 Food Guide: What’s in and what’s out

Food plate

New year, new recommendations for how to design your plate! If you haven’t heard already, Health Canada just released a revamped food guide, making some substantial changes. The biggest updates? A spotlight on plant-based eating and a phasing out of specific food groups and serving sizes, replaced with a balanced, healthy plate. 

It’s time to stick to your new year’s resolution

The new year is here! What better time for the Wouldurather contest helping you with your new year resolutions and habits. The Wouldurather contest is back offering young adults their shot at $10,000 in cash prizes in exchange for their commitment to quitting, cutting back, or staying smoke-free during the span of the contest. Registration is completely free and online, no appointments necessary. The contest begins, and registration closes on Monday, January 28th, 2019 hosted by Leave The Pack Behind.

Ways of overcoming seasonal depression this winter term

Snowy Trees

Winter term has begun which means the days are getting shorter, the temperature is dropping, and the amount of geese is declining. If you get the “winter blues” this season, you may be experiencing seasonal affective disorder (SAD). This condition is a kind of depression appearing only at certain times of the year. For most people, SAD begins in the fall when the days get shorter and lasts through the winter. Some common symptoms of SAD are feeling sleepy all the time, sad, low energy, hopeless, stressed, etc. It is common for Canadians to encounter SAD due to having a northern climate. It is believed that winter SAD may be caused by the lack of sunlight which interferes with the body’s biological clock that regulates sleep, hormones and mood.

Test your sleep health knowledge

a bedroom

How well do you sleep on an average week? If you aren’t sure, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Do you ever fall asleep in class or at your computer?
  • Do you watch the clock as you struggle to fall asleep?
  • Do you routinely procrastinate and then pull all-nighters to meet your deadlines?

Sleep is an important part of a healthy self-care routine which also includes nutritious food, exercise, and mindfulness. Research shows that all-nighters and skipping sleep can impact your academic performance. Consistently getting an optimum amount of sleep is a way that you can do your best academically.

Spending time in nature to increase your wellness

Tents in a campground

Spending time outside can increase both your physical and mental wellness. A UK study which challenged people to do something outside for 30 days in a row found that “there was a scientifically significant increase in people’s health, happiness, connection to nature and active nature behaviours, such as feeding the birds and planting flowers for bees – not just throughout the challenge, but sustained for months after the challenge had been completed.”[i] Your time in nature doesn’t need to be complicated or expensive. Keep reading for some ways to spend mindful moments outside.

Study break exercises you can do at a desk

cartoon woman doing yoga

When you are focused on studying or getting that latest assignment done, it can be easy to sit down and look up only to see several hours have passed without noticing. But long periods of sitting have been shown to be detrimental to both our physical and mental health. Try to take a physical activity break at least once an hour with these exercises that can be done at or near your desk.

Making friends and finding a sense of belonging

friends talking

A sense of belonging to a greater community can improve your motivation, health, and happiness. Studies demonstrate that a sense of social belonging can affect motivation and continued persistence, even on impossible tasks. That is, if you don't feel like you belong, you are both less motivated and less likely to hang in there in the face of obstacles.  

If you are feeling lonely or like you don’t belong it is important to remember:

The Imposter Phenomenon

Writing on a journal page that says "You are enough"

Have you ever thought something like the following?

  • “I don’t belong here. The admissions committee clicked the wrong button when I got my acceptance.”
  • “The co-op before me was so awesome, there’s no way I can ever live up to them. I’ll be fired when they find out I’m not as qualified as them.”
  • “Everybody around me is so good at what they do. I’m the only one who isn’t able to get that job in Cali.”

If yes, you might be suffering from something called Imposter Phenomenon or Imposter Syndrome.

Strategies for dealing with stress

Books open on a desk

Whether it is a deadline or an important life event, we all experience stress from time to time.

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