Research Associate

Department of Economics; Chair, Status of Women and Equity Committee, Faculty Association, University of Waterloo

Profile picture for Kate RybczynskiContact information

Email: krybczynski@uwaterloo.ca

Phone: 519-888-4567 ext 32146

Kate Rybczynski's University of Waterloo profile

Dr. Rybczynski's research interests are broad, spanning topics in Labour Economics, Health, and Poverty, with an underlying focus on Gender and Well-Being. In a SSHRC funded project with Lori Curtis, she explored whether differences in community level market composition correlates with differences in self-reported health. Results indicate that
individuals living in communities with proportionately more small businesses are more likely to report excellent health. In a series of papers on gender and self-employment she found that, relative to men, women have both lower entry and survival rates for self-employment and that reducing liquidity constraints could substantially improve women's ability to enter and succeed in business. Kate's interest in gender inequities has grown, in part, due to her observation of how few women occupy the upper echelons of her own profession, and in part due to her own experience as a female academic.

Selected publications 

Rybczynski, K. (2015). Gender differences in portfolio risk across birth cohort and marital statusCanadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique48 (1), 28-63.

Rybczynski, K. (2015). What drives self-employment survival for women and men? Evidence from CanadaJournal of Labor Research36 (1), 27-43.

Curtis, L. J., & Rybczynski, K. (2014). Exiting poverty: Does sex matter? Canadian Public Policy40 (2), 126-142.

Rybczynski, K., & Curtis, L. (2013). Can market structure explain cross-country differences in health? Farmeconomia. Health, Economics and Therapeutic Pathways, 14 (1), 33-43.

Sen, A., Rybczynski, K., & Van De Waal, C. (2011). Teen employment, poverty, and the minimum wage: Evidence from CanadaLabour Economics18 (1), 36-47.

Rybczynski, K. (2009). Are liquidity constraints holding women back? An analysis of gender in self-employment earningsJournal of Economic Asymmetries(1), 141-165.

Affiliation: 
University of Waterloo