Domain components 

Social and emotional competencies

Basic educational knowledge and skills

Overall academic achievement, attainment, and participation

Education is a core personal resource and a reflection of our ability to function and adapt in society. It is an important predictor of health, living standards, democratic participation, and education for future generations. The Education domain focuses on school-based learning and education rather than informal learning.  Since societies that thrive encourage a thirst for knowledge at every age and stage, the framework of the Education domain includes both traditional indicators of educational achievement along with some less conventional indicators of education across the lifespan.

The Education domain framework identifies three key dimensions for understanding the connections between education and wellbeing: (1) Social and emotional competencies, (2) Basic educational knowledge and skills, and (3) Overall academic achievement and participation.

Social and emotional competencies

The development of social and emotional competencies begins during the early years and continues to develop throughout life. Close friendships, the ability to demonstrate empathy, and a strong sense of self are a few indicators of social and emotional competence. Competency in these areas is characteristic of a good education, and is an outcome of positive examples both inside and outside of the school environment. 

Basic educational knowledge and skills

Basic educational knowledge and skills, such as literacy, numeracy, and science skills typically develop during the first years of school, and can continue to expand throughout the life course. These skills are important to wellbeing as they are needed to function effectively in everyday life.

Overall academic achievement, attainment, and participation

This dimension assesses the number of Canadians completing various levels of education. It also includes participation in life-long learning through continuing education activities. Participation in education is important to wellbeing because it prepares Canadians for a role in the workforce, which in turn leads to desirable social, psychological, and financial outcomes.

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