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Weather bomb shows rising cost of climate change

Thursday, January 4, 2018

A University of Waterloo expert is available to talk about how extreme weather is a reminder of how climate change reflects not only global warming, but also more frequent brutal weather events.
 
Jason Thistlethwaite - Faculty of Environment

Thistlethwaite is a professor and researcher in the Faculty of Environment at the University of Waterloo. He studies the economic effects of climate change, natural disasters and extreme weather. He specifically measures the local costs of extreme weather, property insurance and disaster assistance.
 
“The bomb cyclone is another reminder that our coastal communities are underprepared for the economic risks of climate change. Warmer ocean temperatures associated with climate change are fuelling this massive east coast weather maker. Business closures, road accidents and coastal flooding all represent significant costs that go unplanned for among all levels of government. Despite warnings that climate change will cost our pocketbooks, governments have yet to embrace the adaptation that can save money now for taxpayers.”
- Jason Thistlethwaite

About the University of Waterloo
University of Waterloo is Canada’s top innovation university. With more than 36,000 students we are home to the world's largest co-operative education system of its kind. Our unmatched entrepreneurial culture, combined with an intensive focus on research, powers one of the top innovation hubs in the world. Find out more at uwaterloo.ca.

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Media Contact:

Matthew Grant
University of Waterloo
226-929-7627
www.uwaterloo.ca/news
@UWaterlooNews

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