Presentation rules

Competitors have 1 static slide and 3 minutes to explain the breadth and significance of their research to a non-specialist audience.

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted (e.g. one slide only)
    • no slide transitions, animations or 'movement' of any description, the slide is to be presented from the beginning of the presentation and will remain in view for the duration of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • Presentations are to be spoken word (e.g. no poems, raps or songs, other than those that may be the target of research).
  • Presentations are to commence from the stage.
  • Presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts their presentation through movement or speech.
  • Presentations must be made by memory; notes may not be used.
  • The competition will be administered in English.
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

3MT is committed to accessibility for persons with disabilities. Should you require an accommodation in order to meaningfully participate, please contact Tasha Glover as soon as possible to ensure your accommodation is available.

Judging criteria

At every level of the competition, each competitor will be assessed on the three judging criteria listed below. Please note that each criterion is equally weighted and has an emphasis on audience.

1.  Communication

  • Did the presenter use language and terminology that was clear and understandable?
  • Was the pace of the talk effective?
  • Did the presenter use non-verbal communication (i.e. eye contact, voice modulation, body language, etc.) effectively?
  • Did the slide enhance, rather than detract from, the talk – was it clear, legible, and concise?

2.  Comprehension

  • Did the talk help you to understand the scholarly research and creativity?
  • Did the presenter clearly outline the nature and purpose of the scholarly research and creativity?
  • Did the presenter clearly indicate what is interesting about the scholarly research and creativity?
  • Did the talk follow a logical sequence?

3.  Engagement

  • Was the talk engaging?
  • Did the talk inspire you to want to know more?
  • Did the presenter convey enthusiasm for their work?
  • Did the presenter capture and maintain your attention?