Webinar - Exploring the Efficacy of Portable Lift-Assist Devices to Reduce Exposures Compared to a Manual LiftExport this event to calendar

Tuesday, August 9, 2022 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

This is a free webinar offered through the Client/Patient Handling Community of Practice (CoP), in partnership with CRE-MSD, PSHSA, and VHA Home HealthCare.

In this webinar

Paramedics have a high rate of occupational injuries, and lifting people from the floor contributes to this high incidence of injuries. Portable lift assist devices have the potential to decrease injuries experienced by paramedics during a lift, however, little is known about the efficacy of these devices in reducing musculoskeletal disorders when manually lifting a patient from the floor. This webinar discusses the results of research conducted at an Emergency Medical Services training facility comparing the Elk and Raizer lift assist devices to a manual technique when lifting a patient from the floor.

About the presenters/authors

Amanda Calford is a student researcher in the Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics Lab (OBEL) at the University of Waterloo. Her research focuses on the implementation of assistive technology in Emergency Medical Services to decrease injury risk of paramedics.

Dr. Taylor Cleworth is an Assistant Professor at the School of Kinesiology and Health Science at York University. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Research Institute for Aging (RIA) and University of Waterloo. He applies a multidisciplinary lens to understand the contributing factors leading to balance deficits and falls within older adults. His main areas of research focus on neurophysiological and biomechanical processes involved in balance control, with a specific interest in visuomotor processes during static and dynamic postural tasks.

Dr. Andrew Laing is an Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology & Health Sciences at the University of Waterloo. His general field of interest is musculoskeletal biomechanics related to human health and injury prevention, and the role that advancing age has on these relationships. Dr. Laing's current research program focuses on two injury categories: 1) workplace musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD); and 2) fall-related tissue trauma including hip fractures, spinal cord injuries, and traumatic brain injuries. His workplace research interests involve the development and implementation of participatory ergonomics processes in industry, assessment of potential age-related differences in knowledge capital and physical work capacity associated with manual materials handling, and the effects of flooring designs/properties on risk factors for WMSD in staff working in residential care facilities. This work will support interventions to promote healthy aging and work ability across the lifespan.

Dr. Steven Fischer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology & Health Sciences at the University of Waterloo. He directs research in the Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics Lab (OBEL) where the main thrust of his research focusses on evaluating and enhancing occupational/workplace performance. Dr. Fischer’s current research focuses on developing and evaluating pre/post hire physical employment tests for physical demanding professions; and, on identifying how individual factors (e.g., arm strength, leg strength, etc.) affect movement behaviours when performing occupational tasks. His research is supported by research-industry partnership grants and contracts in addition to government sponsored operating and infrastructure awards. https://uwaterloo.ca/obel | @biomechergolab | OBEL on YouTube

Webinar resources

Webinar recording (Webex)
Password (case sensitive): Lifting2022

Webinar slide presentation (PDF)

For assistance, please contact Betina Butler at bbutler@uwaterloo.ca.


Disclaimer: CRE-MSD receives funding through a grant provided by the Ontario Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development. The views expressed are those of the presenters and do not necessarily reflect those of the Centre nor of the Province of Ontario.

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