Webinar - Ready for Duty: Training Movement Competency and Capacity for ParamedicsExport this event to calendar

Monday, October 19, 2020 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

Webinar series

Emergency service responders and healthcare workers are often faced with physically demanding tasks that include lifting and moving people and/or objects in unpredictable, unmodifiable settings; this makes training a critical component of a comprehensive injury prevention strategy. The excessive physical effort, repetitive movements, and awkward postures these workers encounter daily are a likely cause of the majority of their injuries.

This free webinar series will begin with a webinar summarizing our current understanding of the effectiveness of manual handling training for injury prevention and management; the best available research will also be used to make general recommendations for training program development, implementation and evaluation. This introductory webinar will be followed by webinars that offer more specific summaries and recommendations for three different sectors: Firefighters, Paramedics, and Healthcare workers. 

View the full webinar series

In this webinar

For paramedics to be physically ready for duty they must have the requisite physical capacity and be able to leverage movement competency to complete the demands of work. In this webinar, we present freely available training tools that provide information to paramedics to both increase movement capacity and competency. We also provide background research that was used to support the development of the available tools and demonstrates the importance of both capacity and competency to paramedic workability.

About the presenters

Daniel ArmstrongDaniel Armstrong
Daniel Armstrong is a PhD student in the Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics lab at the University of Waterloo. His research interests include understanding how interacting personal, task and environment factors influence the range of movement strategies an individual uses in the workplace, as well as quantifying the loading implications associated with movement to infer injury risk. Daniel received both his BSc (2016) and MSc (2019) in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo.

Steven FischerSteve Fischer
Dr. Steven Fischer is a leading ergonomics and workplace injury prevention researcher. As Director of the Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics Laboratory at the University of Waterloo, Steven and his team study determinants of movement behavior in the workplace, applying this knowledge to improve: work-related functional capacity evaluation; work simulation using digital human modeling; and proactive injury prevention through the design of better, safer products.

Webinar resources

Webinar recording (Webex)
Password: Training2020

Webinar slide presentation (PDF)

Other resources

To complement this webinar series, CRE-MSD has developed three infographic/poster resources on body positioning for the knee, low back, and shoulder for reducing MSD injury risk when performing non-modifiable tasks. These resources are now available as part of the Ontario MSD Prevention Guideline and can be found in the Resource Library, under the Hazard Control category.

CRE-MSD researchers have also developed a position paper sumarizing current best evidence on this topic: Improving Workplace Manual Handling Training Programs.

For assistance, please contact Betina Butler at bbutler@uwaterloo.ca.


Disclaimer: CRE-MSD receives funding through a grant provided by the Ontario Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development. The views expressed are those of the presenters and do not necessarily reflect those of the Centre nor of the Province of Ontario.

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