“You, Your Slides, and Your Posters: Allies or Foes?”Export this event to calendar

Friday, November 18, 2016 — 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM EST

“Scientists are very often consciously or unconsciously driven by agendas well outside science, even if they do not acknowledge them.”
—Neil Turok, Director, Perimeter Institute, 2012 CBC Massey Lectures

Seminar - Professor Emeritus John Bandler

John Bandler.jpg

In the first few blinks of an eye after you stumble onto the stage, or make an opening stab at your slides or poster, most of your audience has likely made up its mind—and you may not even have “started” your presentation. Perhaps the projector isn’t working, or your microphone has a mind of its own, or you apologize for not finding the room in time. Perhaps your visitor(s) caught you eating at your poster, or you just returned from chatting with a colleague across the room and found someone squinting at your fine print.


Whatever the case, the rest of your performance serves as confirmation of your audience’s bias and first impressions. And besides you, your slides and your posters have their own agenda, subplot or series of subplots that reflect you, your expertise, your authenticity, your passion for your subject, and your attention to issues like relevance, context, clarity, citations, acknowledgments, respect, consistency of fonts, spelling, and those excruciating details in your visual aids that you can’t bear to leave out, and even their artistic composition. At your poster, you have just moments to pitch the importance of your work. As for your oral presentation, remember that your audience may have already sat through several presentations that day.


I use my expertise as a writer and director of plays as well as a professor and entrepreneur (with experience at trade shows) to elaborate on effective presentations at a conference: embracing your audience’s needs; gaining trust; the importance of clarity, citation and acknowledgement; the importance of “story” and admitting setbacks; those crucial first few seconds, and your first few slides; and how to identify and avoid potential traps and pitfalls.


McMaster professor emeritus John Bandler is an engineer, entrepreneur, innovator, researcher, artist, speaker, and author of fiction, including stage plays. He wrote and directed That The Multitude May Live, which can be seen on YouTube, along with Christmas Eve at the Julibee Motel, and other examples of his theatrical work. Some of his talks, including his 2014 TEDx McMaster U talk, are available on the internet. He has published 500 technical papers and contributions to books, has won numerous professional awards, and pioneered the space mapping technology in 1993. In 1997, Hewlett-Packard acquired his company Optimization Systems Associates Inc. He is a Fellow of several societies, including the Canadian Academy of Engineering and the Royal Society of Canada, and has been honoured by a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. He mentors individuals for public presentations, including the Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, and spearheads the team bringing the first ever 3MT® competition to the IEEE International Microwave Symposium in 2017.

Cost 
Free
Location 
DC - William G. Davis Computer Research Centre
Room 1302
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

S M T W T F S
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
  1. 2019 (231)
    1. December (1)
    2. November (2)
    3. October (13)
    4. September (26)
    5. August (26)
    6. July (40)
    7. June (24)
    8. May (23)
    9. April (35)
    10. March (25)
    11. February (9)
    12. January (10)
  2. 2018 (150)
    1. December (13)
    2. November (25)
    3. October (12)
    4. September (13)
    5. August (7)
    6. July (23)
    7. June (9)
    8. May (6)
    9. April (9)
    10. March (16)
    11. February (10)
    12. January (7)
  3. 2017 (212)
  4. 2016 (242)
  5. 2015 (242)
  6. 2014 (268)
  7. 2013 (192)
  8. 2012 (31)