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Matthew Grant
Director, Media Relations

519-888-4451
matthew.grant@uwaterloo.ca

Rebecca Elming
Manager, Media Relations

519-888-4567 ext. 30031
relming@uwaterloo.ca 

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  1. Feb. 14, 2020Differences in airway size develop during puberty, new study finds

    Sex differences in airway size are not innate, but likely develop because of hormonal changes around puberty, reports a new study by the University of Waterloo.

  2. Feb. 13, 2020Storytelling can reduce VR cybersickness

    A storyline with emotionally evocative details can reduce virtual reality cybersickness for some people, according to a new study.

  3. Feb. 11, 2020New sensor provides better leak protection in buildings

    A new, battery-free sensor can detect water leaks in buildings at a fraction of the cost of existing systems.

    The tiny device, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses nanotechnology to power itself and send an alert to smartphones when exposed to moisture.

    By eliminating a battery and related circuitry, researchers estimate their sensor could be commercially produced for $1 each, about a tenth of the cost of current leak detection devices on the market.

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