Chemistry Seminar Series: Jeff SakamotoExport this event to calendar

Wednesday, May 26, 2021 — 10:00 AM EDT

Mechano-electrochemical Phenomena and Anode-free Manufacturing of Solid-state Batteries

Jeff Sakamoto
Professor of Mechanical Engineering,Materials Science,
and Macromolecular Science and Engineering
University of Michigan

Wednesday, May 26, 2021
10:00 a.m.
Online

Abstract

There is tremendous interest in making the next super battery, however Li-ion technology continues to improve and has inertia in several commercial markets.  Recent material breakthroughs in Li metal solid-state electrolytes could enable a new class of non-combustible solid-state batteries delivering twice the energy density (1,200 Wh/L) compared to Li-ion. However, technological and manufacturing challenges remain, creating the impetus for fundamental research.  The discussion will consist of a brief perspective on the solid-state battery landscape, mechano-electrochemical phenomena of solid interfaces, and anode-less manufacturing of Li metal solid-state batteries. 


Jeff SakamotoProfessor Jeff Sakamoto has 25 years of experience studying and translating ceramic materials for electrochemical materials into energy technologies for terrestrial and space applications.  He was a senior researcher at the Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (2000-2007) where he helped develop Li ion batteries for the 2003 Mars rovers, a Professor at Michigan State University (2007-2014), and has been a Professor at the University of Michigan since 2014.  His group synthesizes ceramic electrolytes, studies the coupling of mechanics and electrochemical phenomena, and develops manufacturing processes for solid state batteries.  He received two Major Space Act Awards from the NASA Inventions and Contributions Board, is the primary contributor on 34 patents and received the Teacher-Scholar (2013), and Withrow Excellence in Teaching (2009) Awards at Michigan State University. He also founded Zakuro, Inc., a solid-state battery startup in 2020.

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