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Special Seminar - Jean-Francois BiasseExport this event to calendar

Monday, January 22, 2018 — 9:30 AM EST

Title: Are cryptosystems based on ideal lattices quantum-safe ?

Speaker Jean-Francois Biasse
Affiliation: University of South Florida
Room:  QNC 1501

Abstract:

Shor's algorithm factors RSA integers and solves the Discrete Logarithm Problem (DLP) in quantum polynomial time. Therefore, alternatives to these cryptosystems must be developed to replace the current cryptographic schemes. One of the most interesting family of schemes that have been proposed for the replacement of RSA-based and DLP-based primitives relies on the hardness of finding short vectors in Euclidean lattices. This problem seems intractable, even for quantum computers, and it allows many interesting functionalities such as Fully Homomorphic Encryption. Certain cryptosystems rely on the hardness of finding short vectors in lattices that have the structure of an ideal in a number field (hence the name: "ideal lattice"). This allows a performance gain, but it also raises the question: does this computational problem remain as hard when we restrict ourselves to this specific class of lattices ? In this talk we report on recent results showing that finding short vectors can be significantly faster in certain ideal lattices when using a quantum computer. These results affected certain cryptosystems based on ideal lattices, while others remained quantum-safe. In any case, this showed that the restriction to ideal lattices did affect the hardness of the search for short vectors.

Location 
QNC - Quantum Nano Centre
1501
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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