Current graduate students

In this exhibit, artist Catherine Dallaire re-examines the original Indigenous values in animal and plant life that are often vilified by contemporary Western settler culture. Building understanding between Indigenous and non-Indigenous worldviews is an important step towards peace and conciliation in the Canadian context. Creating space for Indigenous wisdom to guide culture and policy is an integral part of building peace and justice.

“Pop-up” Peace Museum – Presented by the students of PACS 203/HIST 232 (A History of Peace Movements), the Pop-up Peace Museum features 14 exhibits highlighting a wide range of peace and justice movements from the 20th and 21st centuries. Come and visit on Monday, March 25 from 1:00pm to 5:00pm in Room #2202 at Conrad Grebel University College (directly across from Grebel’s front reception desk).

International criminal prosecution is seen by some as an essential tool to end impunity and reduce the extraordinary impact that war crimes and crimes against humanity have on civilians who are trapped in war.  Others criticize international prosecution as simply another form of Westerners attempting to impose their view of justice on a skeptical world while ignoring and silencing the voices of the victims and the communities from which they come. 

This event is part of the Intercollegiate Peace Fellowship Conference, a three day conference that explores the meaning, history, and practice of restorative justice.

This is a public event that is free to attend and open to all. This event is available with American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation.

Conrad Grebel University College’s Peace and Conflict Studies program (PACS) at the University of Waterloo was the first peace studies program in Canada, and has remained a leader in peace education for 40 years. With PACS’ innovative approach to learning, students can choose arts-based assignment options in many courses.

Wednesday, November 2, 2022

Student Profile: Ryan Bromley

Ryan Bromley is a 3A Arts and Business student with a Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS) major. Ryan was a fall 2021 Enterprise Co-op pitch winner. Enterprise Co-op (E Co-op) is a co-op pathway that allows students to pursue an entrepreneurial co-op option in which students start their businesses while earning a co-op credit. Ryan’s original pitch was to create a “Peace to co-op” business that would teach university students critical personal and professional skills related to PACS. Throughout the work term, Ryan displayed incredible flexibility, drive, and vision in his journey through the term as he worked towards a dream that extends beyond the four months of the co-op.