You are here

Courses

Graduate courses 2016-2017

Winter 2017

PHIL 673: Theorizing Power in Knowledge

Dr. Heidi Grasswick

For those interested in how social power dynamics shape the production of knowledge and how to develop good models of inquiry given the role of social power, the field of feminist epistemology has proved to be a rich resource. In this seminar we will investigate some of the key questions, concepts, and concerns of feminist epistemologists and philosophers of science:  How is knowledge socially situated? What does it mean to look at knowledge through a gendered lens and how does the recognition of the interplay of multiple axes of oppression complicate this? How is objective knowledge possible according to feminist epistemologies? After initially examining some of the classic contributions of feminist epistemology, we will turn our attention to recent research in the field, taking up contemporary work on the role of ignorance in knowledge production, the idea of epistemic injustice, and the role of trust in knowing across differently situated agents. Throughout, we will work to understand the influence of feminist epistemologies in contemporary philosophy, as well as consider how feminist epistemologies have guided research on gendered and raced relations.    

PHIL 674: Moral Epistemology

Dr. Patricia Marino

This course on moral epistemology will focus on the role of intuitions and "considered judgments" in moral reasoning and justification. Topics will include: 1) The role of intuitions in contemporary approaches such as reflective equilibrium; 2) the recent debate - drawing on neuroscience and evolution - over whether intuitions are untrustworthy and unreliable and thus ought to be jettisoned in favour of consequentialist reasoning; and 3) whether relying on intuitions promotes or hinders the incorporation of different perspectives - such as lessons from philosophy of disability - into moral theory.

 
PHIL 673: Applied Social Epistemology

Dr. Tim Kenyon

In this course we will critically review some recent work in social epistemology, spanning the epistemology of testimony, disagreement, ignorance, and group knowledge. On the basis of this review, we will identify and analyze actual cases and situations for their socio-epistemological significance.

PHIL 680B: Explanation

Dr. Doreen Fraser

What constitutes a satisfactory answer to a 'why' question? Accounts of explanation that address this question are deployed across the full spectrum of sub-fields of philosophy. We will investigate the relationship between causation and explanation and identify similarities and differences among explanatory practices across a range of disciplines. Other topics to be covered will be chosen by the class.

 

Fall 2016

PHIL 673: Justice and Disability

Dr. Chris Lowry

We will look at why Rawls's liberal egalitarianism has shortcomings concerning issues of justice related to disability, and we will discuss some of the modifications and alternatives developed by Kittay, Daniels, Sen, Nussbaum, and others in response to those shortcomings.

PHIL 673: Concepts and Rules

Dr. John Turri

An investigation of some familiar and important concepts and rules. Topics will include agency, morality, communication, and cognition.

 
PHIL 674: Philosophy and Public Policy

Dr. Katy Fulfer

Philosophical thinking often provides us with concepts and tools we can then apply to problems in the world. But sometimes the world presents us with problems that raise philosophical questions that need untangling. This seminar course will survey problems that emerge from the law and public policy. We will apply philosophical concepts that have emerged "from the armchair" so to speak, but also use examples from real-world problems to refine accepted philosophical views. Significant attention will be given to problems that arise in relation to reproductive healthcare. We will also examine problems related to state apologies for wrongdoing, climate change, and animal ethics. At the end of the course, we will examine some account of how philosophers should engage with public policy, and use our experiences in this course to reflect on such questions.

PHIL 680A: Explanation

Dr. Doreen Fraser

What constitutes a satisfactory answer to a 'why' question? Accounts of explanation that address this question are deployed across the full spectrum of sub-fields of philosophy. We will investigate the relationship between causation and explanation and identify similarities and differences among explanatory practices across a range of disciplines. Other topics to be covered will be chosen by the class.

 


Note: The Schedule of Classes for Graduate Students will provide further information and here is a link to past graduate courses.

Link to: Graduate Studies Office (GSO): Academic Deadlines