You are here

Courses

Graduate courses 2018

Fall 2018

PHIL 673: Theory of Mind

John Turri

An interdisciplinary investigation of the concepts, representations, and abilities that constitute the everyday practices of attributing mental states, predicting and explaining behaviour, and related aspects of social cognition.

 

PHIL 674/676 - Post-War Justice

Brian Orend

An intensive examination of theory and practice in connection with post-war justice, and the transition from armed conflict into a stable peace. We’ll move from short-term, immediate post-war issues like cease-fires, demilitarization, occupation law and war crimes trials, to longer-term considerations such as retributive- versus rehabilitative post-war policies, coercive regime change, and even things like the perpetual peace tradition and the democratic peace thesis. A blend of law and philosophy, and of political theory with international relations, featuring tons of historical case studies ranging from the world wars up to Iraq and Afghanistan. Specific philosophers will include Kant, Hannah Arendt, Rousseau, Michael Doyle, and Michael Walzer. 

 

PHIL 673/675: Feminist Bioethics

Katy Fulfer

Bioethics emerged as a discipline to respond to power differentials between health care professionals and their patients or subjects. Feminists expand the way bioethics anaylzes power, emphasizing structural inequalities that are produced along axes of gender, race, ability, sexuality, sex, socio-economic status, and geographical location (just to name a few). This course will survey ways in which feminists have challenged and revised traditional concepts in bioethics, such as autonomy and vulnerability. We will also examine feminist engagement with medical technologies, such as gene editing and assisted reproduction. Students will gain a foundation in feminist bioethics in this course. No prior engagment with feminist philosophy or bioethics is required.

PHIL 680A - Objectivity

Carla Fehr

In an era of alt-facts and fake news, philosophical investigations of the objectivity of knowledge claims, and of the institutions and people who produce and use those knowledge claims, are more important than ever. The credibility and effectiveness of institutions such as journalism, law, and science rely on sometimes-contentious notions of objectivity. From public policy to parenting, we hope to trust those institutions to produce knowledge that we can use with confidence. This class will critically engage the notion of objectivity from a wide range of philosophical subfields and will consider how philosophical investigations of objectivity can be of use more broadly across and beyond the academy. 



 
 
 

Winter 2019

PHIL 673 - Realism and Anti-Realism

Doreen Fraser

This course will focus on the contemporary realism - anti-realism debate in the philosophy of science. We will examine arguments for and against realism (e.g. the Pessimistic Meta-Induction, the 'No Miracles' Argument, and Underdeterminism arguments) and evaluate contemporary positions on the debate, including variants of structural realism, selective realism, and anti-realist empiricim.

PHIL 674/675 - Social Metaphysics

Shannon Dea

This course introduces students to social metaphysics, the philosophical area at the intersection of metaphysics and the social sciences. Social metaphysicians direct the methods and questions of metaphysics at the social (rather than the natural) world. What is race? What is gender? What is it for something to be socially constructed? Can something be at once a social construction and real? We'll consider these and similar questions through a survey of recent work by social metaphysicians like Sally Haslanger, Elizabeth Barnes, Katharine Jenkins, and Ásta Kristjana Sveinsdóttir.

PHIL 673/675 - Theory and Applications

Chris Lowry

When assessing a theory, we usually ask whether it gives good answers (and good arguments for those answers) to the question(s) the author seeks to answer. We should also think about which questions or practical issues the author has explicitly bracketed or simply failed to acknowledge. If we want to apply a theory to an issue of this sort, what is the best way to do this? We will examine this challenge.

PHIL 680B

Carla Fehr

Continued from fall term.
In an era of alt-facts and fake news, philosophical investigations of the objectivity of knowledge claims, and of the institutions and people who produce and use those knowledge claims, are more important than ever. The credibility and effectiveness of institutions such as journalism, law, and science rely on sometimes-contentious notions of objectivity. From public policy to parenting, we hope to trust those institutions to produce knowledge that we can use with confidence. This class will critically engage the notion of objectivity from a wide range of philosophical subfields and will consider how philosophical investigations of objectivity can be of use more broadly across and beyond the academy. 

 
 

Link to: Graduate Studies Office (GSO): Academic Deadlines