Thesis Defence: Natalie JacksonExport this event to calendar

Friday, April 17, 2015 — 1:00 PM EDT
Of the thesis entitled: PART TEN : A Case for Increased Regulation of Relocatable Buildings in the Province of Ontario
 

Abstract:

This thesis addresses the role that building regulations and codes have in shaping the way in which the pre-fabricated building industry designs, manufactures and installs Relocatable Buildings (RB) used within the Institutional, Commercial and Industrial (ICI) sectors.  It looks at the history and development of the Relocatable Building industry with particular focus on their application and use in the Province of Ontario, within the larger North American context.  Familiar typologies under the umbrella of relocatable buildings include: Manufactured Homes, Emergency Shelters, Portable Classrooms and Industrial Accommodations[1].  Of these categories of relocatable buildings, the latter two will be the focus addressed within this work

The majority of relocatable buildings are manufactured and constructed without the direct involvement of the architectural profession.  Many of these buildings barely meet basic requirements of health, safety, durability, and occupant comfort that is expected of contemporary construction for all other occupied building typologies[2].  This problematic building type needs to garner greater attention from designers, regulators and building officials in order to set in place the framework for clearer regulatory guidelines and requirements for these structures.  Such a framework has the potential to lead to overall improvement of the quality of construction and product delivery within this sector.

This thesis illustrates proposed modifications of the primary documents which set the current regulatory framework for these buildings in Canada: the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Z240 Standard for Manufactured Homes[3]; the CSA A277 Standards for Factory Built Buildings; the Ontario Building Code (OBC) 2012 edition[4]; and the National Building and model voluntary standards, intend to increase and improve the baseline expectations and requirements of building construction in this category with the intent of directly improving the quality of end product being generated by this billion dollar annual Canadian industry.  The resultant goal being that design and construction improvements based on changes in regulation, extend to benefit the lives, and day-to-day experiences, of users and occupants of these relocatable structures.  This thesis examines the potential, details and positive outcomes for revising the OBC to reflect the addition of this new chapter to the code.
 

The examining committee is as follows:

Supervisor:

Committee Members:

Terri Meyer BoakeUniversity of Waterloo

Lloyd Hunt, University of Waterloo
 
David Lieberman, University of Toronto
 
 

External Reader:

Paul Dowsett, Architect, Sustainable TO

 



The committee has been approved as authorized by the Graduate Studies Committee.


The Defence Examination will take place:  

Friday April 17, 2015
1:00PM

Architecture Room 2026  

A copy of the thesis is available for perusal in ARC 2106A.

Location 
ARC - School of Architecture
Room 2026
7 Melville Street South

Cambridge, ON N1S 2H4
Canada

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